Chinese censors yank songs

Government regulating online music sharing

Chinese censors have removed 100 “unauthorized” songs from music websites, including Eminem’s “Cold Wind Blows,” K.T. Tunstall’s “Push That Knot Away” and Bruno Mars’ “Grenade.”

The Culture Ministry said the move was about regulating online music-sharing sites and that it culled songs that lacked authorization or registration, including some by popular Chinese singers such as Jay Chou, S.H.E and Jolin Chai, the Xinhua news agency reported.

The ministry plans to set a standard market for online music sharing by the end of February.

The crackdown also enforces strict censorship rules. Imported music must be passed by the Culture Ministry while local fare needs government authorization.

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