Pic seemingly targets those who regard the absence of dramatic structure as a sign of authenticity.

Vagueness is the hallmark of Marc Meyers’ sophomore outing, “Harvest,” about an Italo-Jewish family’s deathwatch around its charismatic patriarch (Robert Loggia). A venerable cast of Broadway vets interminably wanders through the clan’s Connecticut mansion with no apparent goal, carrying the remains of never fully explained resentments. Told through the eyes of a collegiate grandson (Jack T. Carpenter), the pic also loosely resembles a coming-of-ager, as generalized truths are passed down through generations. Pic seemingly targets those who regard the absence of dramatic structure as a sign of authenticity.

Characters include Barbara Barrie as grandpa’s beloved, dementia-afflicted wife; a couple of unmarried, unsuccessful sons (Arye Gross, Peter Friedman); an oversexed Latino housekeeper (Adriana Sevan); and a New Age daughter (Victoria Clark, gamely working overtime). Lenser Ruben O’Malley’s hand-held camera is constantly aquiver, as if readying itself for some resolution that never arrives, while Duncan Sheik and David Poe’s sad-sack songs compound the drawn-out suffering. In his cancer’s final stages, Loggia experiences a miraculous burst of energy, and joyfully bicycles around a light-filled seaside town. Ever so briefly, the film, like Loggia’s galvanizing geriatric, achieves clarity.

Harvest

Production

A Monterey Media presentation of an Ibid Filmworks production in association with Last Light Corp. Produced by Jody Girgenti, Marc Meyers. Written, directed by Marc Meyers;

Crew

camera (color, HD), Ruben O'Malley; editor, Colleen Sharp; music, Duncan Sheik, David Poe. Reviewed on DVD, New York, May 3, 2011. MPAA Rating: R. Running time: 102 MIN.

With

Robert Loggia, Barbara Barrie, Victoria Clark, Jack T. Carpenter, Arye Gross, Peter Friedman, Adriana Sevan, Kel O'Neill, Christine Evangelista.
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