One of the more convincing, radical and politically volatile docus to come out of the burgeoning good-food genre.

One of the more convincing, radical and politically volatile docus to come out of the burgeoning good-food genre, “Forks Over Knives” advocates quite convincingly for the adoption of a plant-based diet, the intent being the eradication of the diabetes, obesity and hypertension afflicting an increasing number of Americans. Pic’s advocacy for produce and against meat and dairy should make it a lightning rod for the politically corpulent processed-food industry. Whether the film reaches the people it should reach probably depends on getting a well-positioned TV platform following brief theatrical play.

As a narrator, helmer-writer Lee Fulkerson has listened to too much “Dateline,” but as a journalist, he covers the food front: From groundbreaking researchers T. Colin Campbell and Caldwell B. Esselstyn Jr. — doctors who grew up as farmers and eventually rejected the foods of their youth — to everyday people beset by ailments brought on by fat and processed food. What “Forks” barges into, and other health-advocacy films haven’t, is the political clout behind keeping Americans unhealthy. Fulkerson not only addresses this but talks to those responsible, who generally don’t make such a good case — and don’t look too healthy, either.

Forks Over Knives

Docu

Production

A Monica Beach Media presentation. Produced by John Corry. Executive producer, Brian Wendel. Co-producer, Allison Boon. Directed, written by Lee Fulkerson.

Crew

Camera (color), John Orfanopoulos, Richard Chamberlin; editors, Orfanopoulos, Brian Crance, Michael Fahey; music, Ramon Balcazar. Reviewed on DVD, New York, May 2, 2011. Running time: 96 MIN.

With

T. Colin Campbell, Caldwell B. Esselstyn Jr., Joey Acoin, Bill Maher, Michelle Obama. Narrator: Lee Fulkerson.

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