Curious docu celebrates past and present attendants of the Central Parking Lot in Charlottesville, Va.

This curious docu celebrates past and present attendants of the Central Parking Lot in Charlottesville, Va., a peculiarly outcast-friendly place that offers unstructured, laid-back employment to a succession of students, artists, philosophers and dedicated underachievers. Exuding the same half-ironic attitude currently fueling a whole subset of low-budget indie fiction features, an all-male succession of lot-watchers discuss class entitlement, the evils of capitalism and the joys of self-discovery through boredom. Unfortunately, pic’s concept doesn’t stretch to 74 minutes. “The Parking Lot Movie” opens Aug. 6 at Gotham’s ReRun Gastropub Theater.

The lot’s owner (Chris Farina) professes genuine fondness for his oddball staff. Examples of collective creativity abound, such as the erudite graffiti on the cardboard walls of the attendant’s booth (although helmer Meghan Eckman should have banned inclusion of the crew‘s truly awful rap video, which disappoints even in its amateurish artlessness). The guys explain the lot’s zeitgeist and the misanthropy that eventually overtakes them, reinforced by the place’s proximity to bars servicing the U. of Virginia: Nighttime finds preppy parades of drunken frat boys and sorority girls behaving badly, giving humankind in general a bad name.

The Parking Lot Movie

Production

A Redhouse production. Produced, directed by Meghan Eckman.

Crew

Camera (color, HD), Eckman; editors, Eckman, Christopher Hlad; music, Sam Retzer. Reviewed at ReRun Gastropub Theater, New York, July 27, 2010. Running time: 74 MIN.

With

Chris Farina, John Lindaman, Jeffrey Fleischer, John Bylander, Scott Meiggs, Tyler Magill.
Follow @Variety on Twitter for breaking news, reviews and more