Roses on Credit

Pic has little value except as a vivid example of a film's apparently bottomless misogyny.

With:
With: Lea Seydoux, Gregoire le Prince, Pierre Arditti, Arielle Dombasle, Catherine Jacob, Maud Wyler, Florence Thomassin, Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi, Andre Wilms.

A young ’50s femme’s conspicuous consumption symbolizes the evils of postwar European materialism in “Roses on Credit,” Israeli auteur Amos Gitai’s first fully Gallic production. Though based on an acclaimed novel by Elsa Triolet and strikingly shot in widescreen by Eric Gautier, Gitai’s pretentious, pseudo-Godardian pic has little value except as a vivid example of a film’s apparently bottomless misogyny. Lea Seydoux’s thankless role as greedy Marjoline would seem to give “Credit” a touch of class, but the movie’s sneering contempt for upwardly aspirant women is downright toxic, and, as a result, its commercial fate could suffer.

The director hammers away at the movie’s sole message as Marjoline, married to Daniel (Gregoire le Prince) while working for peanuts in a beauty salon, charges a posh new car, wherein she listens dreamily to radio jingles for nail polish and fancy radiators. “I need the new,” she informs her horticulturalist hubby, who eventually gets the bill. Gitai’s view of Marjoline, complete with repeated pans down her bare leg, hardly improves once she gets pregnant and plans an abortion from a feminist doctor. Ironically, the film’s period settings appear alluringly well adorned.

Roses on Credit

France

Production: An Agav Films production, in association with France2, Image et Cie. (International sales: Agav, Paris.) Produced by Laurent Truchot. Executive producer, Richard Allieu. Directed by Amos Gitai. Screenplay, Gitai, Marie-Jose Sanselme, from the book by Elsa Triolet.

Crew: Camera (color, widescreen), Eric Gautier; editor, Isabelle Ingold; music, Louis Sclavis; art director, Manu de Chassigny; costume designer, Moira Douguet. Reviewed at Toronto Film Festival (Masters), Sept. 13, 2010. Running time: 113 MIN.

With: With: Lea Seydoux, Gregoire le Prince, Pierre Arditti, Arielle Dombasle, Catherine Jacob, Maud Wyler, Florence Thomassin, Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi, Andre Wilms.

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