by Scott Z. Burns

When I first read — and wrote about — Kurt Eichenwald’s “The Informant” in 2000, I thought, “This story would make a great movie!” And it has — but in ways I never imagined. Scott Z. Burns’ adaptation manages to simultaneously distill, expand upon and find the unexpected comedy in the incredible story of Mark Whitacre’s wild ride as a high-ranking corporate executive-turned-FBI spy. Whitacre was able to shine a light on the arrogance and greed of food additive giant Archer Daniels Midland. Burns is able to illuminate the dark corners of Whitacre’s troubled mind — something the FBI and everyone around him somehow missed.Writers on
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The strange tune that Burns has written for Whitacre the whistle-blower to play is a tune of corporate and political corruption — and it’s still playing loudly in America. Burns’ rendering of it is by turns funny and sad, ironic and strange. And in a tale filled with lies, it rings all too true.

Arianna Huffington, author of “Right Is Wrong,” is the co-founding editor of the Huffington Post.

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