The old adage about plenty of fish in the sea no longer holds water after a viewing of "The End of the Line," a well-researched and persuasively argued documentary about how man has decimated the world's fish populations.

The old adage about plenty of fish in the sea no longer holds water after a viewing of “The End of the Line,” a well-researched and persuasively argued documentary about how man has decimated the world’s fish populations. A more prosaic outing for British documaker Rupert Murray after his 2005 amnesia chronicle “Unknown White Male,” this latest reminder of the fragility of the environment and the consequences of human greed should hook auds in tube showings, though its lush underwater imagery and sharp presentation could also net some theatrical play.

Expansive pic generously samples locations from Newfoundland, where the cod is on the verge of commercial extinction, to the Straits of Gibraltar, where the bluefin tuna (much prized by sushi lovers) no longer swims so free. In 82 minutes, Murray wrangles enough data to make his point that biology can’t keep up with sophisticated fishing technologies and worldwide demand; attacks high-end restaurants such as Nobu for putting endangered species on the menu; praises Alaska as a paragon of responsible fishing; and urges like-minded viewers to “claim back the ocean” via eminently sensible measures (eating more anchovies notwithstanding).

The End of the Line

U.K.

Production

An Arcane Pictures, Calm Prods., Dartmouth Films presentation. Produced by Claire Lewis, George Duffield. Executive producers, Ted Waitt, Erica Knie, Alexis Zoullas, Chris Gorell Barnes, Christopher Hird, Jess Search. Co-executive producer, Donald Rosenfeld. Directed by Rupert Murray. Based on the book by Charles Clover.

Crew

Camera (color), Murray; underwater camera, John Mcintyre, David Groundwater, Scubazoo; editor, Claire Ferguson; music, Srdjan Kurpjel, Marios Takoushis. Reviewed at Sundance Film Festival (World Cinema -- competing), Jan. 20, 2009. Running time: 82 MIN.

With

Charles Clover, John Crosbie, Brian Mulroney, Jeffrey Hutchings, Callum Roberts, Daniel Pauly, Boris Worm, Manolo Pacheco Luis, Ray Hilborn, Roberto Mielgo Bragazzi, Serge Tudela, Ben Bradshaw, Masanori Miyahara, Rashid Sumaila, Adama Mbergaul, Haidar El Ali, Yvonne Sadovy, Chef Maxwell, Pete Petersen, Steve Palumbi, Richie Nota, Jamie Oliver, Ted Stevens, Matthew Moir, Patricia Majluf, Hardy McKinney.

Filed Under:

Follow @Variety on Twitter for breaking news, reviews and more
Post A Comment 0