Review: ‘Heiran’

A headstrong adolescent falls in love with an illegal Afghan worker in the concise drama "Heiran."

A headstrong Iranian adolescent falls in love with an illegal Afghan worker in the concise social-problem drama “Heiran,” the first fiction feature from documaker Shalizeh Arefpour. Tale’s poignant expression of parental hopes, fears and disappointments will strike a universal chord. Marking the debut of a female directing talent, as well as the last perf by legendary thesp Khosro Shakibaei, here playing a gruff but kindly grandfather, the good-looking, well-acted pic should suit offshore fests and ancillary.

High schooler Mahi (Baran Kosari) lives with her extended family on a farm in northern Iran. After meeting poor but dignified Heiran (Mehrdad Sedighian) on the bus, she won’t consider any other suitors. Her parents, refugees from Abadan, are horrified, as they want her to go to college and make a better life for herself. But the lovesick girl pursues the orphaned youth to Tehran, where they wed in spite of her family’s opposition; Heiran gives up his student visa, and soon falls victim to the overwhelming challenge of trying to make ends meet as an illegal worker. Gorgeous lensing in autumnal tones adds to the story’s melancholy mood, as does the lush score.

Heiran

Iran

Production

A Cinema 79 Co. production, in cooperation with Enbank and the Documentary and Experimental Film Center. (International sales: Sheherazad Media Intl., Tehran.) Produced by Rakhshan Bani-Etemad, Jahangir Kosari. Executive producer, Nava Rohani. Directed by Shalizeh Arefpour. Screenplay, Arefpour, Naghmeh Samini.

Crew

Camera (color), Hossein Jafarian; editor, Sepideh Abdolvahab; music, Alireza Kohan Deyri; production designer/costume designer, Amir Esbati. Reviewed on DVD, Chicago, May 31, 2009. (In Cannes Film Festival -- market; Fajr Film Festival.) Running time: 86 MIN.

With

Baran Kosari, Mehrdad Sedighian, Khosro Shakibaei, Farhad Aslani, Zhahleh Sameti, Fouzhan Arefpour, Mohsen Mokari.

Filed Under:

Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading