That, and other news, in today's Roundup and Recap.

The number of sponsors that have pulled out of Glenn Beck's show is up to 33, but the Politico's Michael Calderone spots a new trend among advertisers; Steering clear of cable partisan talk in general.

He writes, "It’s worth noting that Clorox, for example, isn’t just backing away from Beck’s show, but in a statement, said the company doesn’t want to be “associated with inflammatory speech used by either liberal or conservative talk show hosts."  So they're pulling ads from all political talk shows."

A spokesman for ColorofChange said that the number of sponsors off the show rose to 36 over the weekend, with the latest being Clorox, Lowe's and Sprint.

ColorofChange said that Adam Oberweiser, a spokesman for Clorox, told one of its members: “Per our advertising standards, we don't advertise in programs that display exploitive sex or violence, treat ethnic, religious, or political groups in a disparaging manner, present facts inaccurately or distort them to blatantly partisan advantage, and treat individuals or groups in a demeaning manner. We have had limited advertisements on the Glenn Beck Program in the past, however the statements he made during that show would not adhere to our programming standards.  Furthermore, we will not be advertising on his program in the future since he did violate our own advertising standards.”

Clorox's director of media services, Ellen Liu, said that the policy applies to "all political talk show programs, based on a review of each program (against our TV programming standards) and the unpredictable nature of the content."

Clorox's complete statement: "We pride ourselves in being a responsible advertiser and have established long-standing and strict standards for the selection of television programming. Per our standards, we do not advertise in programs that display exploitive sex or violence; treat ethnic, religious or political groups in a disparaging manner; present facts inaccurately or distort them to blatantly partisan advantage; and treat individuals or groups in a demeaning manner.

"Clorox holds true to our advertising standards and we hold true to our nation's heritage of free expression of political opinions. However, consistent with our standards, we do not want to be associated with inflammatory speech used by either liberal or conservative talk show hosts. After a comprehensive review of political talks shows across the spectrum, at this time we have made a decision not to advertise on political talk shows.

"Today's television programming environment is extremely challenging for responsible advertisers. However, The Clorox Company will continue to exercise special care in all program and station selection. We do not want to support programming that is in conflict with our programming standards."

New prez: Dana Delany has been named co-president of the Creative Coalition. She succeeds Tony Goldwyn and will serve alongside Tim Daly.

Hitting the Right: Rapper Jay-Z  hits Rush Limbaugh and Bill O'Reilly in a new track released over the weekend.

Penn Station Politics: "Mad Men" delves into the preservation movement.

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