• Candice Bergen, nominated this year for her work on “Boston Legal,” holds the record for most Emmys won by a female performer for the same role in the same series. She took home five Emmys as “Murphy Brown.”

  • The record for most Emmys won by an individual is held by writer-producer James L. Brooks. Responsible for such hits as “Taxi,” “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” “The Tracey Ullman Show” and “The Simpsons,” Brooks has taken home a total of 19 winged statuettes.

  • Six-time nominee George Carlin has never won an Emmy, but it’s not too late. If his posthumous nod for “George Carlin: It’s Bad for Ya!” should yield a statue, he’ll be in good company. Both Ingrid Berman (“A Woman Called Golda”) and Marion Lorne (“Bewitched”) won after their deaths.

  • Of this year’s honorees, the record for most nominations without a win is held by “Rescue Me’s” Charles Durning (nine). He’s closely followed by Alec Baldwin (seven) and Ryan Seacrest (six).

  • 2008’s class of first-time Emmy nominees includes Don Rickles, Carrie Fisher, Gabriel Byrne, Howie Mandel, Catherine Keener, Paul Giamatti, Ralph Fiennes, Kevin Spacey and Anjelica Huston.

  • With 16 noms, “Mad Men” holds the most of any drama series in 2008 — but is still a long way from catching “NYPD Blue’s” 1994 record of 27 nods.

  • This year, “ER” added two more noms to its record-setting grand total, hitting 122. Only “Cheers” comes close, with 117. But “Frasier” has won the most gold, taking home 37 statues.

  • “John Adams” earned 23 noms this year, more than any other show in any category. Not bad, although “Roots” holds the miniseries record, with 37. “Angels in America” has won more than any other mini, taking home 11 statues.

  • In 1960, Harry Belafonte became the first African-American performer to win an Emmy when he took home a statuette for “Tonight With Belafonte.”

  • In 1993, Betty Thomas became the first woman to win a directing Emmy for the HBO comedy “Dream On.” That same year, HBO’s “The Larry Sanders Show” became the first cable show to be nominated for best comedy series.

  • The first Emmy Awards were held in 1949 at the Hollywood Athletic Club, recognizing only achievements in Los Angeles-area programming.

  • It wasn’t until 2000 that the Television Academy changed voting rules and allowed members to judge Emmy entries in their own homes.

  • In some years, the Emmys have rewarded themselves, last feting the broadcast’s producers in 1977 for achievement in coverage of special events. The category has since been eliminated, though awards shows now get their kudos in the variety, music or comedy special category.

  • 2008’s class of first-time Emmy nominees includes Don Rickles, Carrie Fisher, Gabriel Byrne, Howie Mandel, Catherine Keener, Paul Giamatti, Ralph Fiennes, Kevin Spacey and Anjelica Huston.

  • Of this year’s honorees, the record for most nominations without a win is held by “Rescue Me’s” Charles Durning, with nine noms. He’s closely

    followed by Alec Baldwin (seven) and Ryan Seacrest (six).

  • With 16 noms, “Mad Men” holds more than any other drama series in 2008 — but is still a long way from catching “NYPD Blue’s” record of 27 nods in 1994.

  • This year, “ER” added two more noms to its record-setting grand total, hitting 122. Only “Cheers” comes close, with 117. But “Frasier” has won the most gold, taking home 37 statues.

  • “John Adams” earned 23 noms this year, more than any other show in any category. Not bad, although “Roots” holds the miniseries record, with 37. “Angels in America” has won more than any other mini, taking home 11 statues.

  • In 1993, Betty Thomas became the first woman to win a directing Emmy for the HBO comedy “Dream On.” That same year, HBO’s “The Larry Sanders Show” became the first cable show to be nominated for best comedy series.

  • The first Emmy Awards were held in 1949 at the Hollywood Athletic Club, recognizing only achievements in Los Angeles-area programming.

  • In 1960, Harry Belafonte became the first black performer to win an Emmy when he took home a statuette for “Tonight With Belafonte.”

  • It wasn’t until 2000 that the TV Acad changed voting rules and allowed members to screen Emmy entries in their own homes. Before that, they were required to judge noms in hotel rooms.

  • In some years, the Academy has awarded the show itself. In 1977, director John C. Moffit along with art directors Brian C. Bartholomew and Keaton S. Walker all took home statuettes for special events coverage. The category has since been eliminated, though awards shows now get their kudos in the variety, music or comedy special category.
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