Review: ‘The Puppini Sisters – ‘The Rise & Fall of Ruby Woo’’

While Brit contemporaries Amy Winehouse and the Pipettes borrow aspects of their sound from the 1960s, London's Puppini Sisters turn the clock back even further.

While Brit contemporaries Amy Winehouse and the Pipettes borrow aspects of their sound from the 1960s, London’s Puppini Sisters turn the clock back even further. The trio takes their inspiration from ’30s and ’40s close-harmony vocal groups (most obviously the Andrews Sisters) and adds a few modern twists.

With the U.S. release of their sophomore album “The Rise & Fall of Ruby Woo,” the Puppinis continue to mine vintage standards — “It Don’t Mean a Thing (If it Ain’t Got That Swing),” “Old Cape Cod,” — as well some more contemporary tunes. Songs that fall into the latter category — the Bangles’ “Walk Like an Egyptian,” Beyonce’s “Crazy in Love” — are fun, but come off as too tongue-in-cheek, and border on parody rather than homage (although “Crazy” features a killer violin solo). Original compositions “I Can’t Believe I’m Not a Millionaire,” “Jilted” and especially the stellar, cinematic “And She Sang” fare better.

The Puppini Sisters - 'The Rise & Fall of Ruby Woo'

Verve Records

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