"Digi Snacks"is the third installment in RZA's Bobby Digital series -- a loose concept chronicling the misadventures of a hedonistic superhero from the hood.

“Digi Snacks”is the third installment in RZA’s Bobby Digital series — a loose concept chronicling the misadventures of a hedonistic superhero from the hood. The narrative is convoluted to the point of non-existence and the beats don’t seem to mesh in any coherent way.

Mostly, the songs stand alone as singles, schizophrenically switching between RJD2-inspired soul mash-ups (“Money Don’t Own Me,” “You Can’t Stop Me Now”), haunted hardcore (“Long Time Coming”) and glossy piano-led pop “Drama.” The latter employs the well-worn, “hip-hop with a message” formula: wide-eyed nursery-rhyme chorus, preachy lyrics about ghetto life and an overarching emphasis on upward mobility through hard work.

The only standout track on “Digi Snacks” is the methodic, slow jam “Good Night.” Amid a flurry of moans and gently pulsing drum machines, RZA’s deep tenor melts effortlessly into the amorous groove. Thea Van Seijan’s coyly-sung hook is both seductive and wistful, conjuring the innocence of youth while brimming over with undeniable sexual energy.

As the Wu-Tang Clan’s original producer and sonic mastermind, RZA built caustic soundscapes for the group’s bold, surrealistic rhymes. Early on, his musical vision was breathtakingly bleak and the results were a series of raw classics that drastically altered the course of hip-hop — Wu Tang’s “Enter the Wu Tang (36 Chambers),” GZA’s “Liquid Swords” and Raekwon’s “Only Built 4 Cuban Linx.” He is not at his best here.

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