The Window

As elegant in its storytelling as in its story, Carlos Sorin's "The Window" is a tale of age and mortality that firmly resists the "cute" tag reflexively assigned to movies with old people, and mines a rich, deep vein of melancholy and humor.

With:
With: Antonio Larreta, Maria del Carmen Jimenez, Emilse Roldan, Arturo Goetz, Jorge Diez, Carla Peterson, Luis Luque, Roberto Rovira.

As elegant in its storytelling as in its story, Carlos Sorin’s “The Window” is a tale of age and mortality that firmly resists the “cute” tag reflexively assigned to movies with old people, and mines a rich, deep vein of melancholy and humor. Marking a return to Patagonia for the Argentine helmer (2004’s “Bombon: el perro”), “The Window” will have as good a chance at cracking the hard-shell foreign-language market as any other film this year.

If that doesn’t seem to ring with hope and optimism, it’s because “The Window” would have as tough time in American theaters in English as it will in Spanish, given that so much of its charm and art are between the lines. It’s a film that needs to be actively watched, not passively experienced.

With an almost palpable sense of place — and more importantly, a particular household — Sorin tells a story of remembrance and regret, two things he sees as inseparable. Eightysomething Argentine aristocrat Antonio (Antonio Larreta) is awaiting the return of his long-absent son, Pablo (Jorge Diez), a world-class pianist.

Bedridden, waited on hand-and-foot by his two faithful housekeepers (Maria del Carmen Jimenez, Emilse Roldan), Antonio can do nothing himself about the preparations for his son. But he dictates from beneath the sheets: The decrepit piano must be tuned; the 40-year-old bottle of champagne must be retrieved. (One of the film’s most revealing, and characteristic, gestures is Antonio’s pulling the liquor cabinet key from his pajama pocket.) We get a sense of why Pablo went away.

Almost nothing is overt in “The Window.” The piano tuner (played by the wonderfully satyr-like Roberto Rovira) provides a soundtrack of fractured notes as the women bustle and the lord of the manor reflects. Antonio eventually “escapes” — he decides to take a walk around the hacienda — and the crisis that ensues brings youth and energy into the movie in a way that makes the enfeeblement of Antonio and his mansion all the more poignant.

Sorin has constructed a reflective poem, one that’s never solemn, always insightful and sometimes hilarious. When Pablo finally arrives, the umbilical attachment of his wife, Claudia (Carla Peterson), to her cell phone is the one suggestion that perhaps Antonio lives in a better world than us. It’s an ephemeral moment, but it lingers.

Production values are just fine.

The Window

Argentina-Spain

Production: A Guacamole Films S.A. and Wanda Vision presentation. (World sales, Bavaria Film International, Munich). Produced by José María Morales. Directed by Carlos Sorin. Screenplay, Sorin, Pedro Mairal.

Crew: Camera (35mm, color), Julian Apezteguia; editor, Mohamed Rajid; music, Nicolás Sorín; production design, Rafael Neville; sound (Dolby Digital), José Luis Diaz. Reviewed at Toronto Film Festival (Contemporary World Cinema), Sept. 9, 2008. Running time: 85 MIN.

With: With: Antonio Larreta, Maria del Carmen Jimenez, Emilse Roldan, Arturo Goetz, Jorge Diez, Carla Peterson, Luis Luque, Roberto Rovira.

More Film

  • Molly's Game

    TV and 'Peppa Pig' Boost eOne's Results, but Film Revenue Slumps

    As elegant in its storytelling as in its story, Carlos Sorin’s “The Window” is a tale of age and mortality that firmly resists the “cute” tag reflexively assigned to movies with old people, and mines a rich, deep vein of melancholy and humor. Marking a return to Patagonia for the Argentine helmer (2004’s “Bombon: el […]

  • 'Chris The Swiss' Review: Inventive, Dramatic

    Cannes Film Review: 'Chris The Swiss'

    As elegant in its storytelling as in its story, Carlos Sorin’s “The Window” is a tale of age and mortality that firmly resists the “cute” tag reflexively assigned to movies with old people, and mines a rich, deep vein of melancholy and humor. Marking a return to Patagonia for the Argentine helmer (2004’s “Bombon: el […]

  • 'The State Against Mandela and the

    Cannes Film Review: 'The State Against Mandela and the Others'

    As elegant in its storytelling as in its story, Carlos Sorin’s “The Window” is a tale of age and mortality that firmly resists the “cute” tag reflexively assigned to movies with old people, and mines a rich, deep vein of melancholy and humor. Marking a return to Patagonia for the Argentine helmer (2004’s “Bombon: el […]

  • tom cavanagh the flash

    Film News Roundup: 'The Flash' Star Tom Cavanagh Joins Family Drama 'Be the Light'

    As elegant in its storytelling as in its story, Carlos Sorin’s “The Window” is a tale of age and mortality that firmly resists the “cute” tag reflexively assigned to movies with old people, and mines a rich, deep vein of melancholy and humor. Marking a return to Patagonia for the Argentine helmer (2004’s “Bombon: el […]

  • 'Dear Son' Review: Powerful, Affecting Portrait

    Cannes Film Review: 'Dear Son'

    As elegant in its storytelling as in its story, Carlos Sorin’s “The Window” is a tale of age and mortality that firmly resists the “cute” tag reflexively assigned to movies with old people, and mines a rich, deep vein of melancholy and humor. Marking a return to Patagonia for the Argentine helmer (2004’s “Bombon: el […]

  • The Misandrists Review

    Film Review: 'The Misandrists'

    As elegant in its storytelling as in its story, Carlos Sorin’s “The Window” is a tale of age and mortality that firmly resists the “cute” tag reflexively assigned to movies with old people, and mines a rich, deep vein of melancholy and humor. Marking a return to Patagonia for the Argentine helmer (2004’s “Bombon: el […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content