Part of a trend in collectively made Latin American films, "The Wind and the Water" is an unusual work hatched by young Panamanians inside and outside the country's indigenous Kuna tribe.

Part of a trend in collectively made Latin American films, “The Wind and the Water” is an unusual work hatched by young Panamanians inside and outside the country’s indigenous Kuna tribe. Crudely made political romance pitting young heartthrobs against the big, bad corporation plays like a wan workshop pic, but could be the basis for future prospects in a Central American country with little previous moviemaking activity. Fests with a taste for Third World cinema should come calling.

Like a city mouse and a country mouse, teen girl Rosy (Yirelis Adjani Smith) and village lad Machi (Benjamin Avila) are seen in a lengthy, intercut section: She shops and hangs out with her pals, while he leaves his Kuna village to study in Panama City. As a resort developer plots to intrude on the tribal reserve with a major project, the kids are inspired by tribal elders to find ways to fend off company plans.

The Wind and the Water

Panama

Production

An Igar Yala Collective production. Produced by Vero Bollow. Co-producer, Miguel Sanchez. Directed, written by Vero Bollow, Igar Yala Collective.

Crew

Camera (color, DV), David Walter Lech; editors, Bollow, Igar Yala Collective; music, Christopher Anderson-Bazzoli. Reviewed at Sundance Film Festival (World Cinema -- competing), Jan. 23, 2008. Spanish dialogue. Running time: 100 MIN.

With

Benjamin Avila, Yirelis Adjani Smith, Ologwagdi, Arosemena Algis.

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