The Stranger in Me

One of the best advertisements for contraception since "Rosemary's Baby," writer-helmer Emily Atef's sophomore feature, "The Stranger in Me," presents a pared-down portrait of one woman's harrowing struggle against the baby blues.

With:
With: Susanne Wolff, Johann von Bulow, Maren Kroymann, Hans Diehl, Judith Engel, Herbert Fritsch.

One of the best advertisements for contraception since “Rosemary’s Baby,” writer-helmer Emily Atef’s sophomore feature, “The Stranger in Me,” presents a pared-down portrait of one woman’s harrowing struggle against the baby blues. Never venturing beyond its clinical case-study scenario of postpartum depression, pic shows troubled protag going from glum to gloomier until she literally wallows in the mire midway through the narrative. B.O. prospects look slim for this uninspired downer; still, Euro tube and fests may find the subject matter suitable enough for adoption.

The “stranger” in question is, of course, the baby that young couple Rebecca (Susanne Wolff) and Julien (Johann von Bulow) have at the film’s start. Cuddly sprig leaves Rebecca in a sorry state that she only shakes after intensive therapy and a brief hospital stint. Outside its one-way storyline, pic offers the viewer next to nothing in terms of drama or character development: We never understand what, beyond child rearing, these young folks are even living for. Flat lensing and cheerless suburban setting seem ripe for TV, which is likely where this orphan will find its happiest home.

The Stranger in Me

Germany

Production: A Ventura Film release of a Niko Film, ZDF/Das kleine Fernsehspiel, DFFB production, in association with Arte. (International sales: Bavaria Film Intl., Munich.) Produced by Nicole Gerhards, Hanneke van der Tas. Directed by Emily Atef. Screenplay, Atef, Esther Bernstorff.

Crew: Camera (color), Henner Besuch; editor, Beatrice Babin; music, Manfred Eicher; production designer, Annette Lofy; costume designer, Anja Niehaus. Reviewed at Cinematheque Francaise, Paris, April 30, 2008. (In Cannes Film Festival -- Critics' Week.) Running time: 99 MIN.

With: With: Susanne Wolff, Johann von Bulow, Maren Kroymann, Hans Diehl, Judith Engel, Herbert Fritsch.

More Film

  • Hit Australian TV Series 'Miss Fisher'

    Hit Australian TV Series 'Miss Fisher' set for Movie Adaptation

    One of the best advertisements for contraception since “Rosemary’s Baby,” writer-helmer Emily Atef’s sophomore feature, “The Stranger in Me,” presents a pared-down portrait of one woman’s harrowing struggle against the baby blues. Never venturing beyond its clinical case-study scenario of postpartum depression, pic shows troubled protag going from glum to gloomier until she literally wallows […]

  • Director Abel Ferrara attends the New

    Italy's Vivo Film to Produce Abel Ferrara's 'Siberia', Other New Films (EXCLUSIVE)

    One of the best advertisements for contraception since “Rosemary’s Baby,” writer-helmer Emily Atef’s sophomore feature, “The Stranger in Me,” presents a pared-down portrait of one woman’s harrowing struggle against the baby blues. Never venturing beyond its clinical case-study scenario of postpartum depression, pic shows troubled protag going from glum to gloomier until she literally wallows […]

  • Chinese Streaming Giant iQIYI Opens First

    Chinese Streaming Giant iQIYI Opens First Conventional Movie Theater

    One of the best advertisements for contraception since “Rosemary’s Baby,” writer-helmer Emily Atef’s sophomore feature, “The Stranger in Me,” presents a pared-down portrait of one woman’s harrowing struggle against the baby blues. Never venturing beyond its clinical case-study scenario of postpartum depression, pic shows troubled protag going from glum to gloomier until she literally wallows […]

  • 'Gotti' Review

    Cannes Film Review: John Travolta in 'Gotti'

    One of the best advertisements for contraception since “Rosemary’s Baby,” writer-helmer Emily Atef’s sophomore feature, “The Stranger in Me,” presents a pared-down portrait of one woman’s harrowing struggle against the baby blues. Never venturing beyond its clinical case-study scenario of postpartum depression, pic shows troubled protag going from glum to gloomier until she literally wallows […]

  • 'Murder Me, Monster' Review: Mystifying Art-house

    Cannes Film Review: 'Murder Me, Monster'

    One of the best advertisements for contraception since “Rosemary’s Baby,” writer-helmer Emily Atef’s sophomore feature, “The Stranger in Me,” presents a pared-down portrait of one woman’s harrowing struggle against the baby blues. Never venturing beyond its clinical case-study scenario of postpartum depression, pic shows troubled protag going from glum to gloomier until she literally wallows […]

  • A Quiet Place

    China Box Office: ‘A Quiet Place’ Opens Third Behind ‘Infinity War'

    One of the best advertisements for contraception since “Rosemary’s Baby,” writer-helmer Emily Atef’s sophomore feature, “The Stranger in Me,” presents a pared-down portrait of one woman’s harrowing struggle against the baby blues. Never venturing beyond its clinical case-study scenario of postpartum depression, pic shows troubled protag going from glum to gloomier until she literally wallows […]

  • Patricia Morison Dead: 'Kiss Me Kate'

    Patricia Morison, Stage Star of 'Kiss Me, Kate', Dies at 103

    One of the best advertisements for contraception since “Rosemary’s Baby,” writer-helmer Emily Atef’s sophomore feature, “The Stranger in Me,” presents a pared-down portrait of one woman’s harrowing struggle against the baby blues. Never venturing beyond its clinical case-study scenario of postpartum depression, pic shows troubled protag going from glum to gloomier until she literally wallows […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content