Theoretically, writers have plenty of time to put together a script for their pilot. They can tinker all they want, right up to the taping, so it should be a grand effort. There’s no excuse for a lazy or poorly executed finished product.

It’s episode No. 2 that often gives viewers a more accurate sense of the quality of the series, of what they’re going to see for the next 21 episodes. And that’s why I was so excited to see "The Big Bang Theory" hold up incredibly well creatively.Bang

While the pilot made me laugh, there was little, if any, letdown last night. With the story by exec producers Chuck Lorre and Bill Prady, and the teleplay by Robert Cohen and Dave Goetsch, the characters were delivering one zinger after another, and not necessarily the kind where you could see the jokes coming from a mile away.

Maybe more than any other new show, the casting is spot on. Johnny Galecki has been a pro since his "Roseanne" days but relative newcomer Jim Parsons has comedic timing that would seem virtually impossible to teach. Either you have it or you don’t, and he’s got it. Big time.

Their buddies — Simon Helberg and Kunal Nayyar — add just the right notes as well and 21-year-old Kaley Cuoco, who feels like a TV vet at this point after turns on "8 Simple Rules for Dating My Teenage Daughter" and "Charmed," plays ditzy with more charm than most actresses would.

Ratings held on strong in week two as well (read Rick Kissell’s story here), which is a good sign this one will be here for awhile.

And don’t forget to pause the Tivo and read Lorre’s rants on the title cards at the very end of the show. Hilarious.

If these geeks are around for years to come, that’s fine by me.

— Stuart Levine

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