Tony Burton and Sylvester Stallone

A grand album that captures Annie Lennox in her gospel-belting glory, “Songs of Mass Destruction” is a refreshing return to form for the former Eurythmics star.

A grand album that captures Annie Lennox in her gospel-belting glory, “Songs of Mass Destruction” is a refreshing return to form for the former Eurythmics star. Gone is the deep introspection of “Bare,” replaced by a compelling blend of the electronic and the organic (i.e., pianos and organs galore) with Lennox’s voice dominating every tune. A production triumph for Glen Ballard, who allows instruments to swell (“Love is Blind”) or sit still (“Dark Road”) in supporting Lennox, album boasts a cohesion and a soul-invigorating energy. “Womankind” works as a sequel to her ‘80s track with Aretha Franklin, “Sisters are Doin’ It For Themselves”; “Big Sky” taps into Moby’s hitmaking style; and while the ambitiousness of the all-star single “Sing” might not be fully realized, it does not detract from the overall effort. Lennox’s lyrical approach is consistently direct, even a little obvious in places. Memories are a favorite subject, but she’s best at examining the indecisive points in a romance and the challenge of breaking through or stepping away.

Annie Lennox – 'Songs of Mass Destruction'

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