No Man’s Land

The mesmerizing effect of Harold Pinter's "No Man's Land" rests in the irresistible pull of an audience trying to wrap its mind around an ever-evolving understanding of what is happening onstage. In "Waiting for Godot," the yearning for narrative sense and significance is soon abandoned in Beckett's stark cosmos; here, however, Pinter tantalizingly doles out hope that clarity -- or something like it -- is right around the London corner. Or the next. Or the one after that.

With:
Hirst - Paul Benedict Spooner - Max Wright Foster - Henry David Clarke Briggs - Lewis D. Wheeler

The mesmerizing effect of Harold Pinter’s “No Man’s Land” rests in the irresistible pull of an audience trying to wrap its mind around an ever-evolving understanding of what is happening onstage. In “Waiting for Godot,” the yearning for narrative sense and significance is soon abandoned in Beckett’s stark cosmos; here, however, Pinter tantalizingly doles out hope that clarity — or something like it — is right around the London corner. Or the next. Or the one after that.

After all, it’s such a civilized setting, this handsome, either half-empty or half-full tomb of an English study, grandly though sparingly designed by J. Michael Griggs and lit with just the right amount of ambiguous ambiance by Kenneth Helvig. Characters dress in suits, drink Scotch and talk of poetry, purpose and the past. But this theatrical no man’s — and, in this case, no woman’s — land is a mine field filled with the tension of potential emotional explosions.

It also requires fancy footwork for a production to keep everyone alert and engaged. An audience could easily drift away — or feel as elegantly entrapped as the characters onstage — as things become more and more refracted in the maze of mystery and contradictions.

So it behooves both audience and production to simply relax and allow a pair of deliciously inventive yet precise actors to find their own way through the elliptical script with its own secret sense.

A.R.T.’s stylish, solid production under old Pinter hand David Wheeler has a pair of splendid vets in the lead roles: a cool, almost in-control Paul Benedict as Hirst, the master of the house and of the fate of his disheveled, garrulous guest Spooner, a down-at-the-heels writer played with desperate delight by beret-sporting Max Wright.

Hirst is a wealthy writer tended by two young manservants, played with appropriate upwardly mobile menace and solicitation by helmer’s son Lewis D. Wheeler (skin-headed Briggs) and Henry David Clarke (Foster), both giving spot-on perfs.

But are the younger men a reflection of the older pair with their own weird dynamic? Or is it all one closeted gay scene? (After all, this is the ’70s, when erotic language was coded and loaded.) Or perhaps it’s a not-so-simple meditation on memory, death or cricket? Maybe the entire play is happening in the mind of whisky-swilling, frequently dazed and disabled Hirst? Or perhaps it’s just Pinter’s mental labyrinth?

“Nothing else will happen forever,” says Foster at one point of the play.

But if all that remains are two perfs (make that four) as deliciously etched as these, then it could be a land of infinite and maddening pleasures.

No Man's Land

Loeb Drama Center, Cambridge, Mass.; 556 seats; $76 top

Production: An American Repertory Theater presentation of a play in two acts by Harold Pinter. Directed by David Wheeler.

Creative: Sets, J. Michael Griggs; costumes, David Reynoso; lighting, Kenneth Helvig; sound, David Remedios; production stage manager, Amy James. Opened May 16, 2007. Reviewed May 19. Runs through June 10. Running time: 2 HOURS, 15 MIN.

Cast: Hirst - Paul Benedict Spooner - Max Wright Foster - Henry David Clarke Briggs - Lewis D. Wheeler

More Legit

  • Prince Harry Meghan Markle

    Who's on the Royal Wedding Guest List?

    The mesmerizing effect of Harold Pinter’s “No Man’s Land” rests in the irresistible pull of an audience trying to wrap its mind around an ever-evolving understanding of what is happening onstage. In “Waiting for Godot,” the yearning for narrative sense and significance is soon abandoned in Beckett’s stark cosmos; here, however, Pinter tantalizingly doles out […]

  • In the Heights

    'In the Heights': Warner Bros. Wins Movie Rights to Lin-Manuel Miranda's Musical

    The mesmerizing effect of Harold Pinter’s “No Man’s Land” rests in the irresistible pull of an audience trying to wrap its mind around an ever-evolving understanding of what is happening onstage. In “Waiting for Godot,” the yearning for narrative sense and significance is soon abandoned in Beckett’s stark cosmos; here, however, Pinter tantalizingly doles out […]

  • School of Rock

    'School of Rock' Captures the Heart and Soul of Messy Adolescence

    The mesmerizing effect of Harold Pinter’s “No Man’s Land” rests in the irresistible pull of an audience trying to wrap its mind around an ever-evolving understanding of what is happening onstage. In “Waiting for Godot,” the yearning for narrative sense and significance is soon abandoned in Beckett’s stark cosmos; here, however, Pinter tantalizingly doles out […]

  • From left, creators David Henry Hwang,

    David Henry Hwang Hopes Hillary Clinton Will See 'Soft Power'

    The mesmerizing effect of Harold Pinter’s “No Man’s Land” rests in the irresistible pull of an audience trying to wrap its mind around an ever-evolving understanding of what is happening onstage. In “Waiting for Godot,” the yearning for narrative sense and significance is soon abandoned in Beckett’s stark cosmos; here, however, Pinter tantalizingly doles out […]

  • LaChanze

    Stagecraft Podcast: LaChanze on 'Summer,' Tony Boosts and Dream Roles

    The mesmerizing effect of Harold Pinter’s “No Man’s Land” rests in the irresistible pull of an audience trying to wrap its mind around an ever-evolving understanding of what is happening onstage. In “Waiting for Godot,” the yearning for narrative sense and significance is soon abandoned in Beckett’s stark cosmos; here, however, Pinter tantalizingly doles out […]

  • Frozen Broadway

    'Frozen' North American Tour to Start at Hollywood Pantages

    The mesmerizing effect of Harold Pinter’s “No Man’s Land” rests in the irresistible pull of an audience trying to wrap its mind around an ever-evolving understanding of what is happening onstage. In “Waiting for Godot,” the yearning for narrative sense and significance is soon abandoned in Beckett’s stark cosmos; here, however, Pinter tantalizingly doles out […]

  • Paradise Blue review

    Off Broadway Review: 'Paradise Blue'

    The mesmerizing effect of Harold Pinter’s “No Man’s Land” rests in the irresistible pull of an audience trying to wrap its mind around an ever-evolving understanding of what is happening onstage. In “Waiting for Godot,” the yearning for narrative sense and significance is soon abandoned in Beckett’s stark cosmos; here, however, Pinter tantalizingly doles out […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content