Devoid of irony or the wink-wink quirkiness that typifies other indie pics, Paul Bojack's rough-edged portrait of desperate souls observes as a series of little white lies and not-so-innocent omissions turn fatal.

Like a working-class “Crimes and Misdemeanors,” “Resilience” hooks an ordinary man with a high-stakes moral dilemma and watches him squirm on the line. Devoid of irony or the wink-wink quirkiness that typifies other indie pics, Paul Bojack’s rough-edged portrait of desperate souls observes as a series of little white lies and not-so-innocent omissions turn fatal: Lonely human resources manager Jimmy (Henry LeBlanc) ends up with blood on his hands after refusing to let a well-intentioned workplace indiscretion jeopardize his cushy job. Arthouse audiences who welcome challenging material will find sustenance in film’s fractured narrative and unflinching characterizations.

Though “Resilience” opens with Jimmy hiring a call girl to play out his fantasy of cheating on a nonexistent girlfriend, as sleazebags go, he’s no worse than the other rock-bottom types who inhabit Bojack’s world. There’s his borderline homeless uncle (Al Rossi), the desperate alcoholic love interest (Julie Alexander) and his unscrupulous cousin (Steve Wilcox), who’s contemplating a date with an underage hooker. Bojack studies these individuals with an almost Sartrean curiosity, damning Jimmy not with a smoking gun but the sound of a dead man’s voice on his answering machine.

Resilience

Production

A Lost Batallion Films release and production. Produced by Cynthia Wright. Executive producers, Andy Kurylko, George Boychuk. Directed, written by Paul Bojack.

Crew

Camera (color, HD), Michael Parry; editor, Brad Mays; music, Markian Fedorowycz; set designer, Peter Rate. Reviewed on DVD, West Hollywood, Oct. 2, 2007. Running time: 100 MIN.

With

Henry LeBlanc, Al Rossi, Julie Alexander, Steve Wilcox, Amy Arce.

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