Review: ‘Crazy Eights’

Bottom-of-the-barrel slasher pic "Crazy Eights" plays like the kind of unfortunate project whose shooting started sans finished script, in hopes it would somehow come together in the editing room.

Bottom-of-the-barrel slasher pic “Crazy Eights” plays like the kind of unfortunate project whose shooting started sans finished script, in hopes it would somehow come together in the editing room. Whether that’s accurate or not, the result is notable mostly for what it lacks: continuity, logical behavior, even the expected violence (most deaths take place offscreen, an unforgivable crime to most horror fans). Why this merited After Dark Horrorfest inclusion is anyone’s guess; technically and otherwise, it’s beneath late-night cable standards.

After a murky flashback about 600 children volunteered by their parents for “harmless behavioral experiments” between 1954 and 1974, we jump forward 20 years — meaning today, or 1994? Whatever. Six childhood friends reunite at a seventh’s funeral, follow the will’s directions to an abandoned house, get locked in, discover a decrepit medical facility, then suddenly remember they were tormented as tots there. Mysterious killings ensue. Thesps often seems to be making it up as they go along, staring worriedly at nothing in particular, making generic comments like “We gotta get outta here!” Indeed. Location is atmospheric, but brownish images are too dark.

Crazy Eights

Production

An After Dark Films release of an American World Pictures presentation of an IKM, Lost Coast Drive production. Produced by Dan DeLuca, John Kaila, James Koya Jones. Executive producers, Jones, Rick Whealen. Directed by James Koya Jones. Screenplay, Jones, Dan DeLuca.

Crew

Camera (color, video-to-35mm), Stephen M. Lyons; editors, Jones, Ji-un Kwon; music, Olivier Glissant, Chuck Hammer, Nick Nolan; production designer, Rebecca Shpak. Reviewed at Century Plaza 10, South San Francisco, Nov. 12, 2007. MPAA Rating: R. Running time: 80 MIN.

With

Traci Lords, Dina Meyer, George Newbern, Gabrielle Anwar, Dan DeLuca, Frank Whaley.
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