Scribe wrote 'Vicar of Dibey,' 'Girl in the Cafe'

LONDON — The British Academy of Film and TV Arts will bestow Richard Curtis with the Academy Fellowship, the org’s highest accolade, at the British Academy Television Awards on Sunday.

Curtis started his illustrious television career in 1978 as writer on the BBC’s “Not the Nine O’Clock News,” before going on to write the “Blackadder” series and “Mr. Bean,” the Rowan Atkinson vehicle that has since become a bankable feature film franchise.

Curtis has also written well-loved Dawn French starrer “The Vicar of Dibey” and “The Girl in the Cafe,” a television drama based around the G8 summit that collected three Emmy Awards.

In addition to his TV work, Curtis has written or co-written a host of successful features including “Four Weddings and a Funeral” (for which he was Oscar-nommed), “Bean,” “Notting Hill,” “Bridget Jones’s Diary” and “Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason.” In 2003 he wrote and directed “Love Actually.”

“From ‘Vicar of Dibley’ to ‘Comic Relief’ to ‘Notting Hill’ and much more besides, his work is loved and praised widely in Britain and abroad. As a writer and producer, he has harnessed the power of television for international causes that have helped shape the world we live in,” commented Peter Salmon, BAFTA TV committee chair.

Curtis is co-founder and vice-chairman of Comic Relief, the charity organization that runs Red Nose Day in Britain. He has co-produced the 10 live nights of Comic Relief for the BBC since 1987.

Curtis was a founding member of the Make Poverty History coalition and worked throughout 2004 and 2005 on the campaign and Live 8.

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