The makers of the vidgame tie-in to "300" were faced with a nearly impossible challenge: How does one convert the visually arresting style of the graphic novel and movie into an animated adventure for the pocket-size PSP? Not like this, that's for sure.

The makers of the vidgame tie-in to “300″ were faced with a nearly impossible challenge: How does one convert the visually arresting style of the graphic novel and movie into an animated adventure for the pocket-size PSP? Not like this, that’s for sure.

If it were able to match the movie’s unique visuals and mind-blowing action, “300: March to Glory” would likely be a big hit among young male gamers, who almost surely will make up the movie’s opening weekend audience. But publisher Warner Bros. and developer Collission Studios instead put out the kind of generic, unforgivably boring, hack-and-slash product that gamers have seen too many times before.

While the movie’s unique style stands out from other ancient Greek epics, “March to Glory” is almost indistinguishable from the many sword-fighting games that have come before it. When controlling Spartan king Leonidas, there are only two basic attacks that come out of a whole lot of button mashing, as well as a magic system that gets frustrating to use.

It’s slightly more fun to control a group of Spartan warriors in “phalanx” formation, essentially a line of warriors, but they have limited mobility and just two ways to attack as well.

There are five different classes of enemies in the game, but it hardly matters, since they’re interchangeable and very politely attack one at a time, like the ninjas in a Bruce Lee movie. Bosses at the end of each level are only marginally more exciting.

Technically, the game is a mess. The soundtrack starts and stops in strange places, and because of the lack of camera control, battles are at times waged literally off the screen.

Theoretically, it’s a nice bonus that Warner Bros. included stunning trailers, concept art and stills from the movie. But after experiencing the mundane and derivative game, players might not appreciate the reminder of how far short of its source material “300: March to Glory” falls.

300: March to Glory

Production

A WB Games presentation of a game licensed by Warner Bros. and developed by Collision Studios for the PlayStation Portable.
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