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Hong Kong Film Festival expands

Event to include 300 films

HONG KONG — The Hong Kong Film Festival has expanded to a whopping 23 days with 300 films from 52 countries and regions.

This year’s frame will be the lengthiest in the history of the fest as its schedule is made to coincide with Entertainment Expo, the umbrella for eight events including the fest, FilMart and the Hong Kong Film Awards.

Opening pics will be Hong Kong’s “Eye in the sky,” helmed by Yau Nai-hoi and produced by Johnnie To, and the previously announced South Korean pic “I’m a Cyborg, but that’s OK,” helmed by Park Chan-wook.

Fest will be the Asian premiere for “Eye in the Sky,” which preemed in Berlin’s Forum section.

Of the 300 pics in the fest, which runs between March 20 and April 11, 16 will be world premieres, nine will be international and 22 will be seen in Asia for the first time.

Highlights are some of the Chinese pics in competition, pics in the Young Romanian Cinema section and the documentary program. These are “the best the fest has put together,” Peter Tsi, prexy of the Hong Kong International Film Festival Society, said.

Standout pics, according to Tsi, include Zhang Yaodong’s “Mid-Afternoon Barks” about the anonymity and randomness of modern Chinese life. Pic is running in the Asian Digital Competition section as a world premiere, along with “Things We Do When We Fall in Love,” helmed by James Lee from Malaysia. Pic, about frustrated love, was title that fest fought hardest to obtain.

”We tried hard to get this for a world premiere,” Tsi said.

Other highlights include “Final Score” helmed by Soraya Nakasuwan from Thailand in the Humanitarian Awards for Documentaries section, “The Other Half” by Ying Liang and “The Obscure” by Lu Yue in the Chinese Renaissance section.

Fest is also showcasing the retrospective “Li Han-hsiang, Storyteller,” which is organized by the Hong Kong Film Archive and a tribute to the late Hong Kong filmmaker.

The fest doesn’t have a formal closing film “because the festival was too long,” Tsi said. Instead, it’s treating the Hong Kong Film Awards gala as the closer, he added.

There’s also Prokofiev’s “Peter & the Wolf” with the Hong Kong Sinfonietta on the closing day, which will be “fun and for the family,” Tsi said.

This year’s frame will be the lengthiest in the history of the fest as its schedule is made to coincide with Entertainment Expo, the umbrella for eight events including the fest, FilMart and the Hong Kong Film Awards.

Opening pics will be Hong Kong’s “Eye in the sky,” helmed by Yau Nai-hoi and produced by Johnnie To, and the previously announced South Korean pic “I’m a Cyborg, but that’s OK,” helmed by Park Chan-wook.

Fest will be the Asian premiere for “Eye in the Sky,” which preemed in Berlin’s Forum section.

Of the 300 pics in the fest, which runs between March 20 and April 11, 16 will be world premieres, nine will be international and 22 will be seen in Asia for the first time.

Highlights are some of the Chinese pics in competition, pics in the Young Romanian Cinema section and the documentary program. These are “the best the fest has put together,” Peter Tsi, prexy of the Hong Kong International Film Festival Society, said.

Standout pics, according to Tsi, include Zhang Yaodong’s “Mid-Afternoon Barks” about the anonymity and randomness of modern Chinese life. Pic is running in the Asian Digital Competition section as a world premiere, along with “Things We Do When We Fall in Love,” helmed by James Lee from Malaysia. Pic, about frustrated love, was title that fest fought hardest to obtain.

”We tried hard to get this for a world premiere,” Tsi said.

Other highlights include “Final Score” helmed by Soraya Nakasuwan from Thailand in the Humanitarian Awards for Documentaries section, “The Other Half” by Ying Liang and “The Obscure” by Lu Yue in the Chinese Renaissance section.

Fest is also showcasing the retrospective “Li Han-hsiang, Storyteller,” which is organized by the Hong Kong Film Archive and a tribute to the late Hong Kong filmmaker.

The fest doesn’t have a formal closing film “because the festival was too long,” Tsi said. Instead, it’s treating the Hong Kong Film Awards gala as the closer, he added.

There’s also Prokofiev’s “Peter & the Wolf” with the Hong Kong Sinfonietta on the closing day, which will be “fun and for the family,” Tsi said.

“>HONG KONG — The Hong Kong Film Festival has expanded to a whopping 23 days with 300 films from 52 countries and regions.

This year’s frame will be the lengthiest in the history of the fest as its schedule is made to coincide with Entertainment Expo, the umbrella for eight events including the fest, FilMart and the Hong Kong Film Awards.

Opening pics will be Hong Kong’s “Eye in the sky,” helmed by Yau Nai-hoi and produced by Johnnie To, and the previously announced South Korean pic “I’m a Cyborg, but that’s OK,” helmed by Park Chan-wook.

Fest will be the Asian premiere for “Eye in the Sky,” which preemed in Berlin’s Forum section.

Of the 300 pics in the fest, which runs between March 20 and April 11, 16 will be world premieres, nine will be international and 22 will be seen in Asia for the first time.

Highlights are some of the Chinese pics in competition, pics in the Young Romanian Cinema section and the documentary program. These are “the best the fest has put together,” Peter Tsi, prexy of the Hong Kong International Film Festival Society, said.

Standout pics, according to Tsi, include Zhang Yaodong’s “Mid-Afternoon Barks” about the anonymity and randomness of modern Chinese life. Pic is running in the Asian Digital Competition section as a world premiere, along with “Things We Do When We Fall in Love,” helmed by James Lee from Malaysia. Pic, about frustrated love, was title that fest fought hardest to obtain.

”We tried hard to get this for a world premiere,” Tsi said.

Other highlights include “Final Score” helmed by Soraya Nakasuwan from Thailand in the Humanitarian Awards for Documentaries section, “The Other Half” by Ying Liang and “The Obscure” by Lu Yue in the Chinese Renaissance section.

Fest is also showcasing the retrospective “Li Han-hsiang, Storyteller,” which is organized by the Hong Kong Film Archive and a tribute to the late Hong Kong filmmaker.

The fest doesn’t have a formal closing film “because the festival was too long,” Tsi said. Instead, it’s treating the Hong Kong Film Awards gala as the closer, he added.

There’s also Prokofiev’s “Peter & the Wolf” with the Hong Kong Sinfonietta on the closing day, which will be “fun and for the family,” Tsi said.

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