You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Modern Men

Not to speak ill of the half-dead, but "Modern Men" is a prime example of why the WB has struggled to establish an identity in comedy. A nondescript sitcom that's little more than a three-man version of NBC's "Four Kings," there's nothing here bearing even a glancing resemblance to the net's better dramas -- beginning with the premise, in which the show's twentysomething guys spend every waking moment trying to get laid.

With:
Tim Clarke - Josh Braaten Kyle Brewster - Max Greenfield Doug Reynolds - Eric Lively Molly Clarke - Marla Sokoloff Dr. Victoria Stangel - Jane Seymour Tug Clarke - George Wendt

Not to speak ill of the half-dead, but “Modern Men” is a prime example of why the WB has struggled to establish an identity in comedy. A nondescript sitcom that’s little more than a three-man version of NBC’s “Four Kings,” there’s nothing here bearing even a glancing resemblance to the net’s better dramas — beginning with the premise, in which the show’s twentysomething guys spend every waking moment trying to get laid. The twist, such as it is, involves the trio retaining Jane Seymour as their “life coach.” Some remedial instruction in sitcom construction might have helped, too.

When we meet these unlikely best buddies, Tim (Josh Braaten) is being dumped by his girlfriend; Doug (Eric Lively) is still pining for his ex-wife; and Kyle (Max Greenfield) is waltzing through a series of one-night stands. It’s Tim, the triumvirate’s one semi-relatable character, who gloms onto the life-coach idea after a nudge from his sister (a too-little-used Marla Sokoloff of “The Practice”), concluding, “Unless we want to be old and alone, we need to evolve.”

There’s ample room for life guide Victoria (Seymour) to impart snippets of advice — like being honest with women — that immediately yield significant dividends to the manly knuckle-draggers. That’s because the women are little more than oversexed sitcom props — which is odd, really, considering the female skew of the WB audience.

Representing a first foray into half-hour comedy by Jerry Bruckheimer, “Modern Men” actually leaves you hoping the producer will revert to bigscreen form and blow something up.

Braaten possesses a certain easygoing charm, but his buddies are too-familiar cartoons, and the vast majority of setup/joke combinations are painfully obvious. Even Seymour and George Wendt, as Tim’s dad, can’t ground the show in any semblance of reality.

Moreover, the guys literally spend every moment entangled with women, whether it’s testing Victoria’s schemes or analyzing the strategies afterward. Don’t they ever catch a ballgame together or something?

It’s up to Kyle, the ladies’ man, to drive home the underlying message with characteristic subtlety. “I’ve dug my own grave — with my penis,” he says in the second episode.

Well, sure, who hasn’t? But that doesn’t mean anybody should feel obligated to watch.

Modern Men

Series; WB, Fri. March 17, 9:30 p.m.

Production: Filmed in Los Angeles by Jerry Bruckheimer Television in association with Warner Bros. Television. Executive producers, Marsh McCall, Jonathan Littman, Bruckheimer; co-executive producers, Ross McCall, Aaron Peters; producer, Faye Oshima; director, James Widdoes; writers, Ross McCall, Peters, Marsh McCall.

Crew: Camera, Julius Metoyer Jr.; editors, Kenny Tintorri, Brent Carpenter; music, Steve Hampton, John Adair; casting, Greg Orson, Lesli Gelles. Running time: 30 MIN.

Cast: Tim Clarke - Josh Braaten Kyle Brewster - Max Greenfield Doug Reynolds - Eric Lively Molly Clarke - Marla Sokoloff Dr. Victoria Stangel - Jane Seymour Tug Clarke - George Wendt

More TV

  • 'The Bachelor' Recap: Arie Luyendyk Jr.

    'The Bachelor' Recap: Arie Luyendyk Jr. Faces 'The Bekah-ning'

    Not to speak ill of the half-dead, but “Modern Men” is a prime example of why the WB has struggled to establish an identity in comedy. A nondescript sitcom that’s little more than a three-man version of NBC’s “Four Kings,” there’s nothing here bearing even a glancing resemblance to the net’s better dramas — beginning […]

  • CBS Orders Pilots From Gloria Calderon

    CBS Orders Pilots From Gloria Calderon Kellett, Amanda Green, Michelle Nader

    Not to speak ill of the half-dead, but “Modern Men” is a prime example of why the WB has struggled to establish an identity in comedy. A nondescript sitcom that’s little more than a three-man version of NBC’s “Four Kings,” there’s nothing here bearing even a glancing resemblance to the net’s better dramas — beginning […]

  • NBC Orders FBI Drama 'The Enemy

    NBC Orders FBI Drama 'The Enemy Within' From 'Mentalist' Writer to Pilot

    Not to speak ill of the half-dead, but “Modern Men” is a prime example of why the WB has struggled to establish an identity in comedy. A nondescript sitcom that’s little more than a three-man version of NBC’s “Four Kings,” there’s nothing here bearing even a glancing resemblance to the net’s better dramas — beginning […]

  • Timeless

    TV News Roundup: 'Timeless' Sets Season 2 Premiere Date on NBC

    Not to speak ill of the half-dead, but “Modern Men” is a prime example of why the WB has struggled to establish an identity in comedy. A nondescript sitcom that’s little more than a three-man version of NBC’s “Four Kings,” there’s nothing here bearing even a glancing resemblance to the net’s better dramas — beginning […]

  • "The Matrimonial Metric" -- Pictured: Sheldon

    Delayed Viewing Ratings: 'Big Bang Theory' Winter Premiere Starts 2018 Strong

    Not to speak ill of the half-dead, but “Modern Men” is a prime example of why the WB has struggled to establish an identity in comedy. A nondescript sitcom that’s little more than a three-man version of NBC’s “Four Kings,” there’s nothing here bearing even a glancing resemblance to the net’s better dramas — beginning […]

  • Morgan Freeman and Peter Dinklage Bring

    PepsiCo's Super Bowl Commercial for Doritos, Mountain Dew is Two Ads in One

    Not to speak ill of the half-dead, but “Modern Men” is a prime example of why the WB has struggled to establish an identity in comedy. A nondescript sitcom that’s little more than a three-man version of NBC’s “Four Kings,” there’s nothing here bearing even a glancing resemblance to the net’s better dramas — beginning […]

  • What We Do in the Shadows

    'What We Do in The Shadows' Series Lands at FX With Pilot Production Commitment

    Not to speak ill of the half-dead, but “Modern Men” is a prime example of why the WB has struggled to establish an identity in comedy. A nondescript sitcom that’s little more than a three-man version of NBC’s “Four Kings,” there’s nothing here bearing even a glancing resemblance to the net’s better dramas — beginning […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content