Review: ‘The United States of Nothing’

S<B>tephen Sewell should stick to writing. He is one of Australia's finest, and though the desire for scribes to direct their own scripts is strong, most often it should be resisted. Then again, everyone has to start somewhere, and if Sewell really wants to strike out as a director, the co-production season at Griffin Stablemates is a good place to practice. Pity, though, that he chose to practice on "The United States of Nothing," a sound script crying out for another draft and a more experienced director.

Stephen Sewell should stick to writing. He is one of Australia’s finest, and though the desire for scribes to direct their own scripts is strong, most often it should be resisted. Then again, everyone has to start somewhere, and if Sewell really wants to strike out as a director, the co-production season at Griffin Stablemates is a good place to practice. Pity, though, that he chose to practice on “The United States of Nothing,” a sound script crying out for another draft and a more experienced director.

Play picks up themes from Sewell’s acclaimed “Myth, Propaganda and Disaster in Nazi Germany and Contemporary America.” In that earlier work, a U.S. citizen feared he was losing his mind in the post-9/11 panic and nationalistic surge. Here, a white family seeks refuge at a sports arena as a hurricane bears down on their city.

The site is overrun by panic that swiftly infects this frightened foursome. But as staged here, there’s too much senseless screaming, and the characters are straight out of TV.

Roy Billing’s Dad is like the combat guy from “Lost,” complete with khaki artillery jacket; Katrina Foster’s Mom is a stupid version of Marcia Cross’ desperate housewife; Amelia Cormack’s Ashley is modeled on Kelly Osbourne; and Kristian Schmid’s Randy is just a little bit Bart Simpson.

Sewell’s play articulates how simplistically Australia’s arts intelligentsia views the U.S. populace — the kids are slackers, the parents are hicks and they’re all dumb.

While there are too many long-winded soliloquies, there are some funny scenes as well, such as when Mom discovers illicit substances of increasing strength stashed about her daughter’s body.

As dad sets a tripwire around their claimed plot of the arena’s midfield, it becomes apparent this family is an example of extreme capitalist individualism, though some will argue Sewell’s vision isn’t extreme at all. At one point Dad laments that everyone spends too much time thinking about everyone else, when they should be worrying about themselves.

Mom: “We’re a caring family that only wants the rest of the world to live exactly the same way we do.”

The big picture comes in for a shellacking, too. Sewell has joined the chorus of those asking how the U.S. can possibly establish peace in the Muslim world if it can’t even evacuate its own from a storm. If only he’d managed to answer that question.

The United States of Nothing

SBW Stables Theater, Sydney; 120 seats; A$29 ($22) top

Production

A Wilburforce and Griffin Stablemates presentation of a play in one act, written and directed by Stephen Sewell.

Creative

Set, Karia Urizar; lighting, Damien Cooper; original music, Basil Hodges; production stage manager, Liam Fraser. Opened, reviewed Jan. 9, 2006. Running time: 1 HOUR 40 MIN.

Cast

Chip (Dad) - Roy Billing Ashley - Amelia Cormack Jackie (Mom) - Katrina Foster Randy - Kristian Schmid
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Legit News from Variety

Loading