Review: ‘The Green Shade’

A boatload of Bangla citizens representing every stripe of society tries to flee genocide from Pakistani soldiers in Humayun Ahmed's rudimentary adaptation of his novel, "The Green Shade." Symbolic to a fault, pic needs a director of unique skills and a taste of adventure to enliven the story about a group of passengers going down river in 1971.

A boatload of Bangla citizens representing every stripe of society tries to flee genocide from Pakistani soldiers in Humayun Ahmed’s rudimentary adaptation of his novel, “The Green Shade.” Symbolic to a fault, pic needs a director of unique skills and a taste of adventure to enliven the story about a group of passengers going down river in 1971. Unfortunately, renowned scribe Ahmed is not that helmer. After a local premiere in late 2004, Bangladesh’s Oscar submission looks to play primarily in niche fests.

During bloody (off-screen) military attacks on those fighting to secure an independent Bangladeshin then-East Pakistan, a melange of everyday folks flees aboard a rickety steamer commissioned by a stressed-out middle-class man (Humayun Faridi). He’s upset by this small flood of plebeians, including a Hindu family whose presence may attract Pakistani soldiers on the river. Inevitably, the group of Muslims, Hindus and educated non-believers on the boat learns to get along, while a band of Bangla rebels disguised as musicians uses the boat to attack a Pakistani army unit. Lensed on film, version screened was a tele-cine print that left plentiful night scenes virtually opaque.

The Green Shade

Bangladesh

Production

An Impress Telefilm production. (International sales: Impress Telefilm/Channel i , Dhaka, Bangladesh.) Directed, written by Humayun Ahmed, based on his novel.

Crew

Camera (color), Anwer Hossein; editor, Atiqur Rahman Mallik; music, Moksud Jamil Mintu. Reviewed at Palm Springs Film Festival (Awards Buzz), Jan. 9, 2006. Bengali, English dialogue. Running time: 109 MIN.

With

Humayun Faridi, Riaz, Shawan Ahmed, Tania Ahmed, Swadhin , Ahmed Rubel.
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