The Chinese Botanist’s Daughters

Forbidden love upsets the real and symbolic balance of an earthly paradise in "The Chinese Botanist's Daughters," a languid lesbian romance set in China in the early '90s. While pic is lovely to look at, storybook visuals work against what should be a heart-wrenching tale of desire, ignorance and discrimination.

With:
With: Mylene Jampanoi, Li Xiaoran, Dongfu Lin, Wang Weidong, Nguyen Van Quang, Nguyen Nhur Quynh, Nguyen Thi Xuan Thuc, Yang Jun, le Tung Linh, Chu Hung, Tuo Jilin. (Mandarin dialogue)

Forbidden love upsets the real and symbolic balance of an earthly paradise in “The Chinese Botanist’s Daughters,” a languid lesbian romance set in China in the early ’90s. While pic (lensed in Vietnam) is lovely to look at, storybook visuals work against what should be a heart-wrenching tale of desire, ignorance and discrimination. Gay fests may prefer a less delicate approach, but theme — secret same-sex love under state-mandated pain of death — is a conversation starter.

At the pic’s outset, Li Min (Mylene Jampanoi) leaves the orphanage where she was raised from age 3 after her parents were killed in a 1976 earthquake. She is to serve a six-week internship with famed botany professor, Chen (Dongfu Lin). As a gift, she brings a talking bird given to squawking “Long live Chairman Mao!” That’s the sum total of comic relief.

Chen, a widower, is a precision-obsessed and humorless disciplinarian, waited on hand and foot by his 20-year-old daughter, the lovely Cheng An (mainland Chinese TV thesp Li Xiaoran). On the lush island where the protags tend to the makings of ancient herbal remedies, one thing leads to another and the two young women are soon tending their own forbidden fruit.

When An’s strapping 26-year-old brother Dan (Wang Weidong) comes home on military leave from Tibet, the prof inexplicably urges his son to marry Min. While deeply unfair to all concerned, the illicit female lovers see this as a way to turn Min’s internship into a permanent situation.

Narrative picks up when, on their honeymoon, Dan demands to know why his bride is not a virgin. In society’s view, even a famine-inducing plague of locusts is better than homosexuality. Cue doom.

Scene of the two women dancing at the ill-fated wedding carries a slight erotic charge, as does Dan’s sadistic anger. But a touch less decorum — and way less music — might have lifted the venture out of the ordinary. French-born, half-Chinese actress Jampanoi learned her Mandarin dialogue phonetically.

The Chinese Botanist's Daughters

France-Canada

Production: A EuropaCorp (in France)/Christol Films (in Canada) release of a Sotela & Fayolle Films, Max Films, EuropaCorp presentation of a Sotela & Fayolle Films, EuropaCorp, France 2 Cinema (France)/Max Films (Canada) production, with participation of Canal Plus, CNC, Telefilm Canada, Sodec Quebec. (International sales: EuropaCorp, Paris.) Produced by Lise Fayolle. Co-executive producers, Fayolle, Maurice Illouz. Co-producers, Roger Frappier, Luc Vandal, Mario Sotela. Directed by Dai Sijie. Screenplay, Dai, Nadine Perront.

Crew: Camera (color, widescreen), Guy Dufaux; editor, Dominique Fortin; music, Eric Levi; production designer, An Bin; costume designer, Wang Xian Yan; sound (Dolby), Wu Lala; assistant director, Robin Sykes. Reviewed at MK2 Odeon, Paris, April 28, 2006. Running time: 96 MIN.

With: With: Mylene Jampanoi, Li Xiaoran, Dongfu Lin, Wang Weidong, Nguyen Van Quang, Nguyen Nhur Quynh, Nguyen Thi Xuan Thuc, Yang Jun, le Tung Linh, Chu Hung, Tuo Jilin. (Mandarin dialogue)

More Film

  • American Animals

    Sundance 2018: Films, Stars & Cultural Moments Gain Early Buzz on Twitter

    Forbidden love upsets the real and symbolic balance of an earthly paradise in “The Chinese Botanist’s Daughters,” a languid lesbian romance set in China in the early ’90s. While pic (lensed in Vietnam) is lovely to look at, storybook visuals work against what should be a heart-wrenching tale of desire, ignorance and discrimination. Gay fests […]

  • Human Affairs

    Slamdance Kicks Off, Prepares to Debut Its Russo Brothers Fellowship

    Forbidden love upsets the real and symbolic balance of an earthly paradise in “The Chinese Botanist’s Daughters,” a languid lesbian romance set in China in the early ’90s. While pic (lensed in Vietnam) is lovely to look at, storybook visuals work against what should be a heart-wrenching tale of desire, ignorance and discrimination. Gay fests […]

  • PGA Honorees 2018

    PGA Honorees Sound Off on Risk, Reward and Storytelling

    Forbidden love upsets the real and symbolic balance of an earthly paradise in “The Chinese Botanist’s Daughters,” a languid lesbian romance set in China in the early ’90s. While pic (lensed in Vietnam) is lovely to look at, storybook visuals work against what should be a heart-wrenching tale of desire, ignorance and discrimination. Gay fests […]

  • Valerian Movie

    French Cinema Box Office Overseas Rebounds in 2017

    Forbidden love upsets the real and symbolic balance of an earthly paradise in “The Chinese Botanist’s Daughters,” a languid lesbian romance set in China in the early ’90s. While pic (lensed in Vietnam) is lovely to look at, storybook visuals work against what should be a heart-wrenching tale of desire, ignorance and discrimination. Gay fests […]

  • Logan Lerman

    Logan Lerman in Talks to Play Dan Rather in JFK Drama 'Newsflash'

    Forbidden love upsets the real and symbolic balance of an earthly paradise in “The Chinese Botanist’s Daughters,” a languid lesbian romance set in China in the early ’90s. While pic (lensed in Vietnam) is lovely to look at, storybook visuals work against what should be a heart-wrenching tale of desire, ignorance and discrimination. Gay fests […]

  • Get Out

    ‘Get Out’ Channeled the Changing Zeitgeist in Exposing Racial Unease

    Forbidden love upsets the real and symbolic balance of an earthly paradise in “The Chinese Botanist’s Daughters,” a languid lesbian romance set in China in the early ’90s. While pic (lensed in Vietnam) is lovely to look at, storybook visuals work against what should be a heart-wrenching tale of desire, ignorance and discrimination. Gay fests […]

  • donna langley

    Donna Langley on Universal Success and the 'Fate of the Movie Gods'

    Forbidden love upsets the real and symbolic balance of an earthly paradise in “The Chinese Botanist’s Daughters,” a languid lesbian romance set in China in the early ’90s. While pic (lensed in Vietnam) is lovely to look at, storybook visuals work against what should be a heart-wrenching tale of desire, ignorance and discrimination. Gay fests […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content