Loaded with underdog heroics and bursting with youthful enthusiasm, "Hula Girls" may be utterly predictable but it sure is a lot of fun. Fact-based tale of girls forming a hula troupe in a dying mining town in mid-'60s Japan has danced its way to beefy B.O. since opening domestically on Sept. 23, and stands a chance of shaking its skirts into foreign markets. Fests and specialty broadcasters will want to snap up this crowd-pleaser.

Data

Domestic Film DAILY

PROVIDED BY: Box Office

  1. 1

    Guardians of the Galaxy

    Daily Gross:$1.6M

    Cume to08.28.14: $258.3M

    Guardians of the Galaxy

    1
    Daily:$1.6M Cumulative:$258.3M Disney 3.68%
  2. 2

    Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

    Daily Gross:$1.1M

    Cume to08.28.14: $150.7M

    Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

    2
    Daily:$1.1M Cumulative:$150.7M Paramount Pictures -0.62%
  3. 3

    If I Stay

    Daily Gross:$1.0M

    Cume to08.28.14: $20.6M

    If I Stay

    3
    Daily:$1.0M Cumulative:$20.6M Warner Brothers / New Line -0.71%

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Loaded with underdog heroics and bursting with youthful enthusiasm, “Hula Girls” may be utterly predictable but it sure is a lot of fun. Fact-based tale of girls forming a hula troupe in a dying mining town in mid-’60s Japan has danced its way to beefy B.O. since opening domestically on Sept. 23, and stands a chance of shaking its skirts into foreign markets. Fests and specialty broadcasters will want to snap up this crowd-pleaser.

Fourth feature by Japan-based ethnic Korean director Lee Sang-il finds him dealing with lighter subject matter, and with a much better touch, than on previous effort, hostage drama “Scrap Metal” (2005).

“Hula” is told through the eyes of Kimiko Tanikawa (Yu Aoi), a spirited teenager living in the coal mining community of Joban, in the country’s chilly northeast.

Dreaming of a life more interesting, Kimiko’s prayers seem to be answered when the local mining company announces plans to construct a Hawaii-themed tourist attraction. The plan seems ludicrous to the locals, and ridicule turns to bitterness when the company lays off half its workforce, citing a slump in demand.

Hula dancers are required for the floor show, and first in line is Kimiko. Naturally the hopefuls prove hopeless — before famous dancer Ms. Madoka (Yasuko Matsuyuki) is drafted to whip the line into shape.

Although there’s not a single real surprise right up to the moment when the girls make their triumphant debut, a gallery of well-drawn characters and keen observations of small-town life make the time pass pleasantly.

Well-cast pic features perky perfs by young cast members and a nice role for Matsuyuki as the dancer who overcomes initial aloofness and embraces job.

Tech package is pro in all departments.

Hula Girls

Japan

Production

A Cine Quanon release (in Japan) of Cine Quanon production, in association with Happinet and SDP (International sales: Fortissimo, Amsterdam). Produced by Hitomi Ishihara. Executive producers, Lee Bong-ou, Hiroshi Kawai, Yoshiaki Hosono. Directed by Lee Sang-il. Screenplay, Lee, Daisuke Habara.

Crew

Camera (color), Hideo Yamamoto; editor, Tsuyoshi Imai; music, Jake Shimabukuro; production designer, Yohei Taneda; sound (Dolby digital), Mitsugu Shiratori; assistant director, Taiichi Sugiyama. Reviewed at Pusan Film Festival (Open Cinema), Oct. 15, 2006. Running time: 110 MIN.

With

Yasuko Matsuyuki, Etsushi Toyokawa, Yu Aoi, Shizuyo Yamazaki. (Japanese dialogue)

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