Review: ‘Damn Yankee Day’

A clueless foreign exchange student deplanes in an America teeming with nothing but cops, killers and assassins in "Damn Yankee Day." Debuting filmmaker Robert Shupe tries to work every device he's learned from classical Hollywood and David Lynch into a loopy surreal-noir narrative. Fringe indie fests may provide safe harbor.

A clueless foreign exchange student deplanes in an America teeming with nothing but cops, killers and assassins in “Damn Yankee Day.” Debuting filmmaker Robert Shupe (who wrote, directed, produced and even sound designed) tries to work every device he’s learned from classical Hollywood and David Lynch into a loopy surreal-noir narrative. It doesn’t hang together, and acting and black-and-white lensing defeat Shupe’s vision, but pic suggests promise. Fringe indie fests may provide safe harbor.

Waiting at an airport for his American hosts to pick him up for his first semester in a Stateside school, Kimmo (Doug Ecks) finds himself pestered by airport staff, taxi drivers, pushy, amateur-hour cops and a suspicious pair who may be smuggling drugs. Soon, Kimmo arrives in a strange suburban setting where he’s under the control of the shady pair and, later, a man in black on the hunt for a U.S. senator. Finale, in Lynch tradition, suggests alternative scenarios, including Kimmo’s own tendency for murder. Pic suffers from poor tech work, particularly sound.

Damn Yankee Day

Production

A James D. Little presentation. Produced by Robert Shupe. Co-producers, Warren Cobb, Jason Edmiston. Directed, written by Robert Shupe.

Crew

Camera (B&W, DV), J.T. Gurzi; editors, Jason Emiston, Nathan Farnsworth. Reviewed at CineVegas Film Festival, Las Vegas, June 15, 2006. Running time: 93 MIN.

With

Doug Ecks, Petar Spajic, Ben Ayap, Jill Salvo, Trason Shoquist, Robert Shupe, Joe Robinson, Sean Clark.
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading