You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

The Invisible Man

Just in time for Halloween, the Aquila Theater Company is distilling H.G. Wells' "The Invisible Man" to its horrible essence. The sci-fi classic always carried the sinister warning that social "invisibility" will result in disaster, and this loose adaptation brings that subtext to the fore. No longer the story of a gifted scientist who makes himself disappear, it is now the study of a man who has invisibility thrust upon him by an unfeeling doctor. Told mostly through dance, the patient's descent into violence and loneliness creates a truly harrowing mood. </B>

Cast:
Mrs. Hall - Peggy Baker Dr. Cuss - John Beasant III The Stranger - Daniel Charon Dr. Kemp - Anthony Cochrane Nurse 1 - Natalie Desch Nurse 3 - Adriane Fang The Janitor - Larry Hahn Candy Striper - Stephanie Liapis Nurse 2 - Catherine Miller The Orderly - Edward Taketa

Just in time for Halloween, the Aquila Theater Company is distilling H.G. Wells’ “The Invisible Man” to its horrible essence. The sci-fi classic always carried the sinister warning that social “invisibility” will result in disaster, and this loose adaptation brings that subtext to the fore. No longer the story of a gifted scientist who makes himself disappear, it is now the study of a man who has invisibility thrust upon him by an unfeeling doctor. Told mostly through dance, the patient’s descent into violence and loneliness creates a truly harrowing mood.

The biggest jolts come first, when we discover the hospital where Dr. Kemp (Anthony Cochrane) is successfully experimenting with making the Stranger (Daniel Charon) invisible. Kemp’s co-workers object, but the protests are necessarily ineffective. With their synchronized stabs of movement — slicing hands, legs that bolt suddenly forward — the generic cluster of doctors and nurses suggest how social conformity is just as effective as a scientific potion at erasing an identity.

The ensemble’s choreography makes an eerie parallel with Charon’s. His body gracefully expresses anguish, but since his face is covered with gauze, his emotions are anonymous. The fluid evocations of despair — which have Charon performing near-acrobatic bends and leaps — are unsettling because they seem so deeply felt, yet they emanate from a character who has been denied identifying features.

In the best way, the show’s first third is almost unbearable, reaching beneath language to create these primal images of isolation. Cochrane’s original music bolsters the effect. Radio announcers speak backward, telephones ring in a screeching pitch, cellos burst through walls of electronic beats: These sounds thrust us into a disorienting world by distorting everything that seems real.

Sadly, the appearance of a plot dilutes the impact of the movement and design. After a salvo of gripping images, the show turns to a more conventional (and thus unsurprising) form of storytelling. There’s little dialogue, but what we get reveals an obvious pattern: Various hospital staff worry about the Stranger, go to check on him and endure a frightening encounter.

There’s an Off Broadway epidemic of this type of unsatisfying dramaturgy, which takes all its characters on variations of the same journey, thus allowing auds to quickly predict how events will unfold. In the case of “The Invisible Man,” we’re invited to impatiently count down the number of nurses who still haven’t met their fate, putting us two steps ahead of everything that happens.

The production would be far more engaging if it could jettison its schematic structure and focus instead on sinister atmosphere. Left to their own devices, auds surely could make the pieces coalesce into a memorable picture of invisibility made deadly.

The Invisible Man

Baruch Performing Arts Center; 199 Seats; $45 top

Production: An Aquila Theater Company presentation of a play in one act by Anthony Cochrane, Peter Meineck, Robert Richmond and Doug Varone, adapted from the novel by H.G. Wells. Directed and choreographed by Varone.

Creative: Sets, Meineck and Richmond; costumes, Megan Bowers; lighting, Jane Cox; original music, Cochrane; production stage manager, Nate Terracio. Opened Oct. 27, 2005. Reviewed Oct. 25. Running time: 1 HOUR 10 MIN.

Cast: Mrs. Hall - Peggy Baker Dr. Cuss - John Beasant III The Stranger - Daniel Charon Dr. Kemp - Anthony Cochrane Nurse 1 - Natalie Desch Nurse 3 - Adriane Fang The Janitor - Larry Hahn Candy Striper - Stephanie Liapis Nurse 2 - Catherine Miller The Orderly - Edward Taketa

More Legit

  • School Girls, or the African Mean

    Off Broadway Review: 'School Girls, or the African Mean Girls Play'

    Just in time for Halloween, the Aquila Theater Company is distilling H.G. Wells’ “The Invisible Man” to its horrible essence. The sci-fi classic always carried the sinister warning that social “invisibility” will result in disaster, and this loose adaptation brings that subtext to the fore. No longer the story of a gifted scientist who makes […]

  • Escape to Margaritaville review

    Pre-Broadway Review: Jimmy Buffett Musical 'Escape to Margaritaville'

    Just in time for Halloween, the Aquila Theater Company is distilling H.G. Wells’ “The Invisible Man” to its horrible essence. The sci-fi classic always carried the sinister warning that social “invisibility” will result in disaster, and this loose adaptation brings that subtext to the fore. No longer the story of a gifted scientist who makes […]

  • Kevin Spacey Sexual Assault

    Old Vic Theater Logs 20 Complaints About Kevin Spacey, Pledges to Improve Accountability

    Just in time for Halloween, the Aquila Theater Company is distilling H.G. Wells’ “The Invisible Man” to its horrible essence. The sci-fi classic always carried the sinister warning that social “invisibility” will result in disaster, and this loose adaptation brings that subtext to the fore. No longer the story of a gifted scientist who makes […]

  • The Drama League Expands DirectorFest to

    The Drama League Expands DirectorFest

    Just in time for Halloween, the Aquila Theater Company is distilling H.G. Wells’ “The Invisible Man” to its horrible essence. The sci-fi classic always carried the sinister warning that social “invisibility” will result in disaster, and this loose adaptation brings that subtext to the fore. No longer the story of a gifted scientist who makes […]

  • The Play That Goes Wrong

    'Come From Away,' 'Falsettos,' 'The Play That Goes Wrong' Join Ahmanson's Upcoming Season

    Just in time for Halloween, the Aquila Theater Company is distilling H.G. Wells’ “The Invisible Man” to its horrible essence. The sci-fi classic always carried the sinister warning that social “invisibility” will result in disaster, and this loose adaptation brings that subtext to the fore. No longer the story of a gifted scientist who makes […]

  • Broadway sales Hello Dolly Anastasia Come

    'Come From Away,' Hit Broadway Musical, Being Made Into Feature Film

    Just in time for Halloween, the Aquila Theater Company is distilling H.G. Wells’ “The Invisible Man” to its horrible essence. The sci-fi classic always carried the sinister warning that social “invisibility” will result in disaster, and this loose adaptation brings that subtext to the fore. No longer the story of a gifted scientist who makes […]

  • Stagecraft podcast Ayad Akhtar

    Stagecraft Podcast: Ayad Akhtar Talks 'Junk,' Pulitzers and Faith (Listen)

    Just in time for Halloween, the Aquila Theater Company is distilling H.G. Wells’ “The Invisible Man” to its horrible essence. The sci-fi classic always carried the sinister warning that social “invisibility” will result in disaster, and this loose adaptation brings that subtext to the fore. No longer the story of a gifted scientist who makes […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content