Review: ‘We Are Not Angels 2’

Scripter-director Srdjan Dragojevic returns to his pure comic roots with hilariously hyper sequel to the 1992 Yugoslav B.O. smash. Raucous look at a swinging dad who freaks out when his 15-year-old daughter becomes catnip to the opposite sex. International play will be hampered by preconceived ideas of Serbian comedies. Remake potential is high.

Setting aside the searing themes of pics like “Pretty Village, Pretty Flame,” scripter-director Srdjan Dragojevic returns to his pure comic roots with the hilariously hyper “We Are Not Angels 2.” Sequel to the 1992 Yugoslav B.O. smash is a raucous look at a swinging dad who freaks out when his 15-year-old daughter becomes catnip to the opposite sex. Non-stop guffaws and a no-holds-barred performance by lead Nikola Kojo is keeping local B.O. at boffo levels, but international play will be hampered by preconceived ideas of Serbian comedies. Remake potential is high.

Original installment had promiscuous ladies’ man Nikola (Kojo) won over to matrimony by pregnant fling Marina (Milena Pavlovic). Now, 15 years later, no one’s surprised the couple aren’t together. Nikola is still permanently stuck in adolescent mode, virtually wearing out the condom dispenser next to his bed.

Though hardly a hands-on dad, Nikola has a good relationship with his tomboy daughter, Sophia (Mirka Vasiljevic), whom he manages to see between his sexual escapades. By mutual consent, he’s to look after Sophia while Marina is on vacation; but just before Marina leaves, she arranges a makeover for her daughter that transforms the sweats-sporting adolescent into a nubile, midriff-bearing hottie.

Nikola’s shocked by the new look, mostly because she’s now exactly the type of girl he’s been screwing. He sets out to protect her from the onslaught of horny boys lining up outside their door. An especially amusing fantasy sequence has Nikola barricading the house as legions of underwear-clad zombies lay siege to Sophia’s virginity.

None of these themes is new, but Dragojevic revels in satirizing the vulgarity of his characters and their situation. As in the original pic, he has an effeminate Angel (Uros Duric) and a manic Devil (Srdjan Todorovic) looking over Nikola. Both comment on the action and guide characters toward either sinful behavior or purity, as the two antagonists amuse themselves with musical numbers and arguments about film genres.

In every way superior to the earlier “We Are Not Angels,” pic takes enormous pleasure in sending up Serbian stereotypes, and maintains an almost Fellini-esque appreciation for the over-the-top and absurd. Dragojevic never crosses the line into cutesy, keeping a constant edge of wicked humor throughout the tight running time.

Kojo walks off with comic honors as Nikola, an infinitely lovable bad boy who’s now older and saggier; but the rest of the cast, many encoring their roles, keeps pace with his manic style. Kudos as well to Marko Glusac’s breakneck editing, and the art and costume designers’ gloriously garish conceptions.

We Are Not Angels 2

Serbia and Montenegro

Production

A Delirium, RTV Pink production. Produced, directed, written by Srdjan Dragojevic.

Crew

Camera (color), Dusan Joksimovic; editor, Marko Glusac; music, Kristina Kovac; production designers, Sasha Jelicic, Biljana Sovilj; costume designers, Sasha Kuljaca, Vesna Teodosic; sound (Dolby Digital), Branko Dordevic; sound designer, Vladan Korac-Koki. Reviewed at Sofia Film Festival (Balkan Screenings), March 11, 2005. Running time: 84 MIN.

With

Nikola Kojo, Mirka Vasiljevic, Srdjan Todorovic, Uros Duric, Milena Pavlovic, Vesna Trivalic, Zoran Cvijanovic, Goran Jevtic, Nenad Stojmenovic, Predrag Miki Manojlovic, Luka Knezevic.
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading