You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

The Warrior Class

Alan Hruska's sophomore outing, after the clumsy, whimsy-laden "Nola," sticks closer to the helmer's solid law background. Results, though only marginally more realistic, nevertheless conform to recognizably earthbound genre templates as a young counselor's first important case ushers in a Mafia boss, a beautiful, drug-addicted key witness and an eye-patched, samurai sword-wielding client.

With:
With: Anson Mount, Erica Leerhsen, Jake Weber, Dan Hedeya, Jamey Sheridan, Robert Vaughn.

Alan Hruska’s sophomore outing, after the clumsy, whimsy-laden “Nola,” sticks closer to the helmer’s solid law background. Results, though only marginally more realistic, nevertheless conform to recognizably earthbound genre templates as a young counselor’s (Anson Mount) first important case ushers in a Mafia boss (Jake Weber), a beautiful, drug-addicted key witness (Erica Leerhsen) and an eye-patched, samurai sword-wielding client (Dan Hedeya). Strong cast builds considerable goodwill toward the narrative, but the script’s internal logic is as formulaic and half-baked as the pic’s action is blocky and unconvincing. Theatrical outlook may hinge on the rising-star leads.

As Francis Ford Coppola did in his legal eagle “The Rainmaker,” Hruska relies on bravura acting turns to carry the plot. Mount brings a nice, self-deprecating humor, which dovetails neatly with the rueful, been-around pro played by Jamey Sheridan Weber channels flashes of his “Medium” domesticity into his loving father/monstrous hubby psychopath. But it is Leerhsen as a magnificently atypical junkie who steals the show. Characters, however, once trotted out with requisitely colorful personality trappings, are simply slotted back into the safely apolitical, by-the-numbers genre machinery.

The Warrior Class

Production: An Archer Entertainment production in association with The Talking Pictures Co. Produced by Jill Footlick, Rachel Peters, Petina Cole, Laird Adamson. Directed, written by Alan Hruska.

Crew: Camera (color), John Thomas; editor, Marc Laub; music, Andy Farber. Reviewed at Hamptons Film Festival, Oct. 21, 2005. Running time: 110 MIN.

With: With: Anson Mount, Erica Leerhsen, Jake Weber, Dan Hedeya, Jamey Sheridan, Robert Vaughn.

More Film

  • ‘S Durga’, ‘Nude’ Approved After Indian

    ‘S Durga’, ‘Nude’ Approved After Indian Censor Changes Tack

    Alan Hruska’s sophomore outing, after the clumsy, whimsy-laden “Nola,” sticks closer to the helmer’s solid law background. Results, though only marginally more realistic, nevertheless conform to recognizably earthbound genre templates as a young counselor’s (Anson Mount) first important case ushers in a Mafia boss (Jake Weber), a beautiful, drug-addicted key witness (Erica Leerhsen) and an […]

  • My Brother's Name Is Robert and

    Berlin Film Review: 'My Brother's Name is Robert and He is an Idiot'

    Alan Hruska’s sophomore outing, after the clumsy, whimsy-laden “Nola,” sticks closer to the helmer’s solid law background. Results, though only marginally more realistic, nevertheless conform to recognizably earthbound genre templates as a young counselor’s (Anson Mount) first important case ushers in a Mafia boss (Jake Weber), a beautiful, drug-addicted key witness (Erica Leerhsen) and an […]

  • Berlinale -- 2018 -- 'Black Port'

    Iceland's 'Black Port' Wins Series Mania Award at CoPro Series Event

    Alan Hruska’s sophomore outing, after the clumsy, whimsy-laden “Nola,” sticks closer to the helmer’s solid law background. Results, though only marginally more realistic, nevertheless conform to recognizably earthbound genre templates as a young counselor’s (Anson Mount) first important case ushers in a Mafia boss (Jake Weber), a beautiful, drug-addicted key witness (Erica Leerhsen) and an […]

  • Gina Rodriguez, Tessa Thompson, Tuva Novotny,

    Film Review: 'Annihilation'

    Alan Hruska’s sophomore outing, after the clumsy, whimsy-laden “Nola,” sticks closer to the helmer’s solid law background. Results, though only marginally more realistic, nevertheless conform to recognizably earthbound genre templates as a young counselor’s (Anson Mount) first important case ushers in a Mafia boss (Jake Weber), a beautiful, drug-addicted key witness (Erica Leerhsen) and an […]

  • Paolo Virzi's 'Notti Magiche' Lures EFM

    Paolo Virzi's 'Notti Magiche' Lures EFM Buyers (EXCLUSIVE)

    Alan Hruska’s sophomore outing, after the clumsy, whimsy-laden “Nola,” sticks closer to the helmer’s solid law background. Results, though only marginally more realistic, nevertheless conform to recognizably earthbound genre templates as a young counselor’s (Anson Mount) first important case ushers in a Mafia boss (Jake Weber), a beautiful, drug-addicted key witness (Erica Leerhsen) and an […]

  • Berlin: Director Philip Groening Examines Magical

    Berlin: Director Philip Groening Examines Magical Time of Youth in 'Brother'

    Alan Hruska’s sophomore outing, after the clumsy, whimsy-laden “Nola,” sticks closer to the helmer’s solid law background. Results, though only marginally more realistic, nevertheless conform to recognizably earthbound genre templates as a young counselor’s (Anson Mount) first important case ushers in a Mafia boss (Jake Weber), a beautiful, drug-addicted key witness (Erica Leerhsen) and an […]

  • IN DEN GÄNGEN (R: Thomas Stuber);

    Berlin Profile: 'In the Aisles' Director Thomas Stuber Talks About the Movie's Outsiders

    Alan Hruska’s sophomore outing, after the clumsy, whimsy-laden “Nola,” sticks closer to the helmer’s solid law background. Results, though only marginally more realistic, nevertheless conform to recognizably earthbound genre templates as a young counselor’s (Anson Mount) first important case ushers in a Mafia boss (Jake Weber), a beautiful, drug-addicted key witness (Erica Leerhsen) and an […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content