Review: ‘The Hidden Tiger’

A jet-black comedy about one man's search for peace in a world seized by chaos, "The Hidden Tiger" takes an absurdist Coen Bros. approach to midlife crisis but pushes too hard to be the probing satire it aspires to. Fests could program this to leaven more somber regional fare, though it will remain hidden from most international distribs.

A jet-black comedy about one man’s search for peace in a world seized by chaos, “The Hidden Tiger” takes an absurdist Coen Bros. approach to midlife crisis but pushes too hard to be the probing satire it aspires to. Fests could program this to leaven more somber regional fare, though it will remain hidden from most international distribs.

Hovering around 50, dyspeptic Bernardo (Alejandro Awada) can’t impregnate loving but ditzy wife Diana (Mausi Martinez) and feels life spinning out of control. Apprehensive over the mysterious presence of sinister Guerrero (Pedro Segni) and with housekeeper Nancy (Natalia Kim) in tow, the troubled couple head off on holiday down the Tigre River. A series of events of escalating outrageousness ensues, culminating in the lashing of Diana to the pilings of the riverside house as he engages in athletic sex with Nancy. Not as cumulatively wild as it sounds, forced self-consciousness typified by Awada’s cockeyed looks of consternation keeps auds at arm’s length. Tech credits are pro. Logo of a prominent fast food chain in the credits suggests the amusingly blunt jabs at them were sanctioned. Co-scripter Guillermo Saccomanno is a prominent novelist.

The Hidden Tiger

Argentina

Production

A Buena Vista International release (in Argentina) of a Kaos presentation of a Patagonik Film Group, Kaos production. Produced by Luis Barone. Directed by Luis Barone. Screenplay, Guillermo Saccomanno, Liliana Esclair, Barone.

Crew

Camera (color), Rodrigo Pulpeiro; editor, Barone; music, Nicolas Posse; art director, Martin Oesterheld; costume designers, Adriana Lopardo, Ulises Conti; sound (Dolby Digital), Sebastian Gonzalez, Lucia Iglesias. Reviewed at Montreal World Film Festival (Focus on World Cinema), Sept. 1, 2005. Running time: 95 MIN.

With

Alejandro Awada, Mausi Martinez, Natalia Kim, Pedro Segni, Luis Ziembrowski.
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