Review: ‘No Songs Of Love’

A trio of German thesps tackle an interesting improvisational music-themed idea but hold the notes too long in "No Songs of Love." Despite sporadic glimpses of a young rock band on tour that suggest the club scene in Germany is remarkably similar to that in the States, pic feels too self-indulgent and insular to get bookings beyond local action.

A trio of exciting young German thesps tackle an interesting improvisational music-themed idea but hold the notes too long in “No Songs of Love.” Despite sporadic glimpses of a young rock band on tour that suggest the club scene in Germany is remarkably similar to that in the States, pic feels too self-indulgent and insular to get bookings beyond local action and adventurous fest play.

Young filmmaker Tobias Hansen (Florian Lukas) decides to make a documentary about his brother Markus (Juergen Vogel), who fronts a band called, appropriately enough, Hansen. Deeply suspicious that live-in g.f. Ellen (Heike Makatsch) has been with his brother behind his back, Tobias invites her along, turning the tour into a Petrie dish of conflicting emotions. Three leads give their all, but too often overlong improv work stops action dead, with drama torpedoed by self-conscious lines such as “ultimately, nobody will be interested in your film.” Tech credits are fluid under obviously challenging circumstances. Markus’ band is composed of actual German musicians, a la Citizen Dick in “Singles,” though Vogel is no Eddie Vedder.

No Songs Of Love

Germany

Production

A Film 1 production. Produced by Henning Ferber, Sebastian Zuehr, Lars Kraume. Directed, written by Lars Kraume.

Crew

Camera (color), Sonja Rom, Alexa Ihrt; editor, Barbara Gies; music, Marcus Wiebusch, Thees Uhlmann, Max Martin Schroeder, Reimar Bustorff. Reviewed at Berlin Film Festival (Panorama), Feb. 17, 2005. Running time: 98 MIN.

With

Florian Lukas, Heike Makatsch, Juergen Vogel.
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