Review: ‘Time Has Come’

A step back for quirky but usually intriguing helmer Alain Guiraudie, "Time Has Come" plays as if set in one of those semi-primitive rural communities the crew from "Star Trek" might stumble upon. Neither original in construction nor engrossing in detail, pic may temporarily ride helmer's quickly won reputation, but even fests will think twice before scheduling this yawner.

A step back for quirky but usually intriguing helmer Alain Guiraudie, “Time Has Come” plays as if set in one of those semi-primitive rural communities the crew from “Star Trek” might stumble upon. Plot is slightly easier to grasp than the superior “No Rest for the Brave,” but it’s also more inconsequential, dealing with mercenaries tracking down kidnappers, and freedom fighters championing vassal-like shepherds. Neither original in construction nor engrossing in detail, pic may temporarily ride helmer’s quickly won reputation, but even fests will think twice before scheduling this yawner.

The imaginary feudal country of Obitania is rife with social discontent. Mercenary Fogo Lompla (Eric Bougnon) is hired to rescue the kidnapped daughter of a wealthy landowner, who’s unaware Fogo is also sympathetic to the guerrillas hoping to alleviate the condition of his shepherds. As usual with Guiraudie, gay relationships are casually woven in: Fogo is having an affair with older Toba Louhan (Jean Dalric), but like everything else in the pic, stability is something only dreamed about. Initial bizarre fascination soon gives way to head-scratching tedium, not helped by mediocre thesping and unremarkable lensing. Cheesy elements remain high.

Time Has Come

France

Production

A Les Films Pelleas production, with the participation of the Centre de la Cinematographie. (International sales: Films Distribution/Mercure Intl., Paris.) Produced by Philippe Martin, Geraldine Michelot. Directed by Alain Guiraudie. Screenplay, Guiraudie, Catherine Ermakoff.

Crew

Camera (color), Antoine Heberle; editor, Stephanie Mahet; music, Jacques Mestres, Bruno Izarn; costume designer Karine Vintache. Reviewed at Cannes Film Festival (market), May 15, 2005. Running time: 91 MIN.

With

Eric Bougnon, Guillaume Viry, Pierre Louis-Calixte, Jean Dalric.

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