Review: ‘Peekaboo’

A modest but effective fable that can be read on several levels, "Peekaboo" concerns a man whose well-being is modified when he's forced to live in, well, a well. Sporting a minimum of dialogue, sophomore pic from Yves Caumon is gently parsed with imaginative and incongruous schtick, which makes it a nice bet for fests, including for kids.

A modest but effective fable that can be read on several levels, “Peekaboo” concerns a man whose well-being is modified when he’s forced to live in, well, a well. Sprightly venture explores haves and have-nots, the evidence of our senses and what makes a house a home. Sporting a minimum of dialogue, sophomore pic from Yves Caumon is gently parsed with imaginative and incongruous schtick, which makes it a nice bet for fests, including for kids.

When a country realtor shows a large, dilapidated old house to Frederic (Antoine Chappey) and his wife Caroline (Lucia Sanchez), he says it has been vacant 32 years. Inside, Raymond (wide-eyed mime Bernard Blancan) hastily scatters his possessions and hides. Soon workmen are refurbishing the place by day, while Raymond spirits away cement and straw to make himself a home in the property’s abandoned well. A sort of benign gremlin, agile Raymond washes his clothes in the pool and secretly borrows or rearranges household objects, resulting in where-are-my-keys confusion for the newcomers. Some area residents believe him to be a ghost but Raymond’s new experiences on the invisible periphery of the family point him toward life among the living.

Peekaboo

France

Production

A Sunday Morning Prods. production. (International sales: Films Distribution, Paris.) Produced by Bertrand Gore, Nathalie Mesuret. Directed by Yves Caumon. Screenplay, Caumon, Emmanuelle Jacob.

Crew

Camera (color), Josee Deshaies; editor, Sylvie Fauthoux; music, Pascal Le Pennec, Thierry Machuel; production designer, Jacques Bufnoir. Reviewed at Cannes Film Festival (Directors Fortnight), May 17, 2005. Running time: 90 MIN.

With

Bernard Blancan, Antoine Chappey, Lucia Sanchez.
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading