You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

The Eclipse

The finale of Antonioni's trilogy of alienation (after "L'Avventura" and "La Notte") remains a keeper, even if this set from the normally unassailable Criterion is not. The film earned a Jury Prize at Cannes in 1962 and cemented the director's reputation. It makes for essential viewing but is hampered here by a mediocre transfer and uneven bonus materials.

With:
With: Monica Vitti, Alain Delon, Francisco Rabal.

The finale of Antonioni’s trilogy of alienation (after “L’Avventura” and “La Notte”) remains a keeper, even if this set from the normally unassailable Criterion is not. Boldly presaging Tarkovsky and Kubrick with its stark, largely wordless images of Cold War foreboding, the film earned a Jury Prize at Cannes in 1962 and cemented the director’s reputation. It makes for essential viewing — especially given its prescient take on technology’s grip on modern humanity — but is hampered here by a mediocre transfer and uneven bonus materials.

Monica Vitti, in perhaps her finest screen turn, embodies the film’s misanthropic themes as Vittoria, a young woman incapable of connecting with either of two suitors. The most memorable hopeful is played by Alain Delon, whose excruciating near-misses with Vittoria play out against a backdrop of yawning Roman streets and soulless cityscape. Long, still shots of drain culverts, streetlamp bulbs and electric fans underscore the romantic ennui but also leave an apocalyptic impression. Rarely has one of the world’s most rapturous cities looked so vitiated, so robbed of conventional cinematic possibility.

Antonioni’s meticulous compositions are, regrettably, accompanied by a persistent flutter and grain. (The disc’s transfer derives from master positives — a less-than-pristine source.) It is less distracting in darker scenes, but much of the film takes place on a sunny day.

Italian docu “Michaelangelo Antonioni: The Eye That Changed Cinema” offers a maddeningly superficial tour through the decades. Ditto a largely dry commentary-cum-lecture by Richard Pena, the knowledgeable Lincoln Center film maven and Columbia U. prof.

The unusually robust booklet is worth some time, however. Along with new essays by Jonathan Rosenbaum and Gilberto Perez, it features excerpts from Antonioni’s own writings.

And don’t skip the 22-minute docu called “Elements of Landscape.” Its star is Italian critic Adriano Apra, who bursts with colorful and astute observations about Antonioni. “There’s the idea that the space around the characters is just as important as the characters themselves,” he says.

Addressing the film’s title, Antonio’s longtime friend, Carlo di Carlo, notes the director filmed an eclipse that occurred during the shoot but opted not to include it. Apra offers a more thought-provoking interpretation, calling the eclipse a tendency toward abstraction and emptiness “beyond the realistic images that we are used to seeing as spectators.”

The Eclipse

Criterion Collection; Two-disc set $39.95

Production: A Criterion Collection release of the 1962 Robert and Raymond Hakim production; Interopa/Cineriz/Paris release. Directed by Michelangelo Antonioni.

Crew: Release: March 15

Cast: With: Monica Vitti, Alain Delon, Francisco Rabal.

More Digital

  • NRA TV

    Amazon Targeted in Calls to Drop NRA TV App, Which Is Also on Apple TV, Roku, Chromecast

    The finale of Antonioni’s trilogy of alienation (after “L’Avventura” and “La Notte”) remains a keeper, even if this set from the normally unassailable Criterion is not. Boldly presaging Tarkovsky and Kubrick with its stark, largely wordless images of Cold War foreboding, the film earned a Jury Prize at Cannes in 1962 and cemented the director’s […]

  • Kylie Jenner spinoff

    Kylie Jenner Tweet, CEO Compensation Package News Drag Snap Stock Down 8%

    The finale of Antonioni’s trilogy of alienation (after “L’Avventura” and “La Notte”) remains a keeper, even if this set from the normally unassailable Criterion is not. Boldly presaging Tarkovsky and Kubrick with its stark, largely wordless images of Cold War foreboding, the film earned a Jury Prize at Cannes in 1962 and cemented the director’s […]

  • arcore

    Google to Make Major Augmented Reality Push at Mobile World Congress (EXCLUSIVE)

    The finale of Antonioni’s trilogy of alienation (after “L’Avventura” and “La Notte”) remains a keeper, even if this set from the normally unassailable Criterion is not. Boldly presaging Tarkovsky and Kubrick with its stark, largely wordless images of Cold War foreboding, the film earned a Jury Prize at Cannes in 1962 and cemented the director’s […]

  • SOUTH KOREA OUTMandatory Credit: Photo by

    Netflix, Korean Talent Giant to Launch ‘YG Future Strategy Office’

    The finale of Antonioni’s trilogy of alienation (after “L’Avventura” and “La Notte”) remains a keeper, even if this set from the normally unassailable Criterion is not. Boldly presaging Tarkovsky and Kubrick with its stark, largely wordless images of Cold War foreboding, the film earned a Jury Prize at Cannes in 1962 and cemented the director’s […]

  • courtney parker - adaptive studios

    Adaptive Studios Taps Courtney Parker as VP of Alternative Programming

    The finale of Antonioni’s trilogy of alienation (after “L’Avventura” and “La Notte”) remains a keeper, even if this set from the normally unassailable Criterion is not. Boldly presaging Tarkovsky and Kubrick with its stark, largely wordless images of Cold War foreboding, the film earned a Jury Prize at Cannes in 1962 and cemented the director’s […]

  • Lionsgate Unveils 'Studio L' Digital Content

    Lionsgate Unveils 'Studio L' Digital Slate With 'Honor List,' 'Most Likely to Murder'

    The finale of Antonioni’s trilogy of alienation (after “L’Avventura” and “La Notte”) remains a keeper, even if this set from the normally unassailable Criterion is not. Boldly presaging Tarkovsky and Kubrick with its stark, largely wordless images of Cold War foreboding, the film earned a Jury Prize at Cannes in 1962 and cemented the director’s […]

  • Amy Poehler - Parks and Recreation

    'Parks and Recreation' Team Rips Into NRA for Using Amy Poehler GIF

    The finale of Antonioni’s trilogy of alienation (after “L’Avventura” and “La Notte”) remains a keeper, even if this set from the normally unassailable Criterion is not. Boldly presaging Tarkovsky and Kubrick with its stark, largely wordless images of Cold War foreboding, the film earned a Jury Prize at Cannes in 1962 and cemented the director’s […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content