You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Night Corridor

The cinematic equivalent of fusion cuisine, gothic tale "Night Corridor" proves that too many influences spoil the soup. Novelist-photographer-filmmaker Julian Lee serves up this devilish brew with plenty of eerie mystery and Lynchian obfuscation, but the offerings intrigue rather than satisfy. Offshore, this is a specialty vid offering.

Cast:
With: Daniel Wu, Wai Ying-hung, Ku Feng, Eddy Ko, Allan Wu, Coco Chiang.

The cinematic equivalent of fusion cuisine, gothic tale “Night Corridor” proves that too many influences spoil the soup. Novelist-photographer-filmmaker Julian Lee serves up this devilish brew with plenty of eerie mystery and Lynchian obfuscation, but the offerings intrigue rather than satisfy. Don’t expect much H.K. sauce in the mix, although there are generous helpings of “Rosemary’s Baby” and “The Ninth Door” stirred in alongside Japanese-style horror. Locals stayed home last fall; offshore, this is a specialty vid offering.

Lee’s starting point is the masterpiece of unsettled Freudian ravings, Heinrich Fuseli’s painting “The Nightmare,” depicting the troubled demons of a sleeping woman’s unconscious. Pic begins as Sam Yuen (H.K. heartthrob Daniel Wu, also co-producing) prepares for an exhibition of his disturbing photos of agonized subjects (helmer Lee’s own work) in his adopted city of London. He receives a call from his mother telling him twin brother Hung has died in Hong Kong.

Ex-nightclub singer mom (Shaw Bros. vet Wai Ying-hung) is a full-time boozer, and there’s something mysterious in the way Hung died. Family adviser Father Chan (Eddy Ko), a tortured priest whose relationship with a school-aged Sam was none too pure, conspires with Sam’s mother to hide Hung’s bizarre manner of death: He was torn to pieces by a pack of frenzied monkeys.

This info is discovered in the library of an old colonial-era club, whose night porter, Luk Si-fan (Ku Feng), introduces Sam to Olivia (Coco Chiang), a woman claiming to be Hung’s g.f. Meanwhile, Sam searches out other demons from his past, particularly radio star Vincent Sze (Allan Wu), for whom Sam has nurtured a hopeless love since they were children.

As with his first feature “The Accident,” Lee got Stanley Kwan onboard as co-producer, and together they talked a number of Hong Kong names into working for peanuts. Shot in just 13 days on a tight budget, pic presents an unsettling, strangely underpopulated metropolis whose empty streets still manage to feel suffocating, like an old B-noir shot mostly at night. But the story takes too many baroque pathways, and overall impression is of a film sampling from too many well-known predecessors.

Wu comes off best as the troubled Sam, not an easy feat when he’s given so many disconnected scenes to tie together. Wai gives a largely one-note performance as the alcoholic mother, pitched at too high a level. Despite budget restrictions, tech credits are strong, and there’s a richness to the nighttime colorings that contributes to the decadent feel.

Night Corridor

Hong Kong

Production: A Pure Film Art Syndicate production. Produced by Stanley Kwan, Daniel Wu. Executive producer, Kingman Cho. Directed, written by Julian Lee, based on his novel.

Crew: Camera (color, widescreen), Wong Chi-ming, Charlie Lam; editor, Yau Chi-wai; music, Jun Kung; production designer, Silver Cheung; costume designer, Coco Ho; sound, Tam Tak-wing. Reviewed at Turin Gay & Lesbian Film Festival (competing), April 27, 2004. Running time: 72 MIN.

With: With: Daniel Wu, Wai Ying-hung, Ku Feng, Eddy Ko, Allan Wu, Coco Chiang.

More Film

  • 12th and Clairmount Movie Review

    Film Review: '12th and Clairmount'

    The cinematic equivalent of fusion cuisine, gothic tale “Night Corridor” proves that too many influences spoil the soup. Novelist-photographer-filmmaker Julian Lee serves up this devilish brew with plenty of eerie mystery and Lynchian obfuscation, but the offerings intrigue rather than satisfy. Don’t expect much H.K. sauce in the mix, although there are generous helpings of […]

  • Sam Rockwell

    Film News Roundup: Palm Springs Festival Honors Sam Rockwell for 'Three Billboards'

    The cinematic equivalent of fusion cuisine, gothic tale “Night Corridor” proves that too many influences spoil the soup. Novelist-photographer-filmmaker Julian Lee serves up this devilish brew with plenty of eerie mystery and Lynchian obfuscation, but the offerings intrigue rather than satisfy. Don’t expect much H.K. sauce in the mix, although there are generous helpings of […]

  • Project Runway

    Weinstein Co. Feeling Pressure to Find a Buyer (EXCLUSIVE)

    The cinematic equivalent of fusion cuisine, gothic tale “Night Corridor” proves that too many influences spoil the soup. Novelist-photographer-filmmaker Julian Lee serves up this devilish brew with plenty of eerie mystery and Lynchian obfuscation, but the offerings intrigue rather than satisfy. Don’t expect much H.K. sauce in the mix, although there are generous helpings of […]

  • Terminator 2: Judgment Day review

    'Terminator' Writing Team Adds Billy Ray to Put Final Polish on Script

    The cinematic equivalent of fusion cuisine, gothic tale “Night Corridor” proves that too many influences spoil the soup. Novelist-photographer-filmmaker Julian Lee serves up this devilish brew with plenty of eerie mystery and Lynchian obfuscation, but the offerings intrigue rather than satisfy. Don’t expect much H.K. sauce in the mix, although there are generous helpings of […]

  • Josh Hartnett, Margarita Levieva Starring in

    Josh Hartnett, Margarita Levieva Starring in Thriller 'Inherit the Viper'

    The cinematic equivalent of fusion cuisine, gothic tale “Night Corridor” proves that too many influences spoil the soup. Novelist-photographer-filmmaker Julian Lee serves up this devilish brew with plenty of eerie mystery and Lynchian obfuscation, but the offerings intrigue rather than satisfy. Don’t expect much H.K. sauce in the mix, although there are generous helpings of […]

  • Mahershala Ali Burn

    Mahershala Ali to Star in, Executive Produce Crime Thriller 'Burn'

    The cinematic equivalent of fusion cuisine, gothic tale “Night Corridor” proves that too many influences spoil the soup. Novelist-photographer-filmmaker Julian Lee serves up this devilish brew with plenty of eerie mystery and Lynchian obfuscation, but the offerings intrigue rather than satisfy. Don’t expect much H.K. sauce in the mix, although there are generous helpings of […]

  • Hermes holiday window

    Le Gentil Garcon Brings Classic Hollywood to Hermes for the Holidays

    The cinematic equivalent of fusion cuisine, gothic tale “Night Corridor” proves that too many influences spoil the soup. Novelist-photographer-filmmaker Julian Lee serves up this devilish brew with plenty of eerie mystery and Lynchian obfuscation, but the offerings intrigue rather than satisfy. Don’t expect much H.K. sauce in the mix, although there are generous helpings of […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content