‘Troy’ spreading the joy at the o’seas B.O.

'Shrek 2' a monster in first int'l bows

With no ogres to contend with except in parts of Asia, “Troy” sailed through its second wave of socko openings overseas over the weekend, which, combined with generally sturdy holdovers, obliterated its domestic results.

Meanwhile, “Shrek 2” began its international campaign with monster numbers in Southeast Asia. Warners’ Greek odyssey amassed an estimated $70 million in 58 markets, marking the studio’s third biggest weekend of all time behind the last two “Matrix” installments.

That propelled pic’s international cume to $145.9 million, leaving domestic’s $85.8 million in its wake. Brad Pitt/Eric Bana starrer seized pole position as it bowed in 11 markets and retained the top spots in 44 out of 47 countries.

Wolfgang Petersen-helmed epic captured $11.2 million from 506 locations in the U.K. (including $4.3 million in sneaks), repping the territory’s biggest debut this year and Warners’ fifth best ever. Japan generated an estimated $6.4 million on 568 screens, with previews — very good but, sans sneaks, 2% below “The Last Samurai”. Italy contributed $6.3 million on 822 (WB’s fourth highest three-day preem) and South Korea stumped up $4.6 million on 289 (the distrib’s third biggest).

“Troy” hauled in roughly $3.2 million on 230 in Russia (the industry’s fifth highest ever), $2.7 million in Taiwan (No. 4 of all time) and $1.6 million on 78, with sneaks, in Denmark, ranking as the biggest opening for an R-rated release.

Pic experienced remarkably mild drops in its second voyages, slipping by 16% to $7.2 million in Germany, spurring the total to $19.2 million. It eased by 11% to $4.6 million in France, banking $10.5 million thus far, and fell by 28% to $4.5 million in Spain, cuming $12.7 million. Other impressive bounties include Australia’s $9 million (declining by 36%), Mexico’s $8.4 million (retreating by 25%) and Brazil’s $4 million.

Unleashed Friday, “Shrek 2” rustled up an estimated $2 million from five Asian markets, led by Hong Kong’s $620,000 on 37, Singapore’s $565,000 on 26 and Thailand’s $343,000 on 40 (despite flooding in Bangkok that hurt the B.O.).

DreamWorks toon drew $337,000 on 79 in the Philippines and $175,000 on 30 in Malaysia. Sequel more than doubled the original’s first three days in Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia and the Philippines, and it beat “Finding Nemo’s” three-day bows in Singapore and the Philippines. UIP is holding back “Shrek 2” in the rest of the world until late June/early July, aiming to capitalize on school vacations.

“Van Helsing” stabilized somewhat, declining by an average of 40% in its third stanza abroad after worrying 55% drops in its second weekend. Writer-director Stephen Sommers’ action adventure collared $14 million from 4,400 playdates in 38 UIP territories plus $1 million from Russia, the Philippines and Iceland, boosting cume to $119 million, according to Universal’s Sunday projections. It’s on course to reach $150 million in those markets and has a shot at hitting $200 million if it clicks in Japan and South Korea.

Hugh Jackman/Kate Beckinsale starrer has racked up an estimated $22.2 million in the U.K. (off 35% at the weekend), $15.2 million in Germany (down 27%), $9.7 million in Spain (losing 42%), $7.7 million Down Under (shedding 32%) and $6.8 million in Mexico (abating by 35%). It’s tracking 40% ahead of “The Mummy Returns” in Spain, 23% up in Oz but just fractionally better in the U.K. and Germany and 23% below in Mexico.

After preeming in Cannes, “The Ladykillers” charmed a respectable $1 million on 200 in Spain and $800,000 in Japan, in the latter prudently restricted to 130 screens.

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