Review: ‘The Carpenter’s Pencil’

Given the richness and depth of the novel on which it is based, "The Carpenter's Pencil" is strangely monotonous emotionally. Merely efficient pic has all the ingredients of the sumptuous Spanish Civil War drama it aspires to be: A storyline packed with incident, excellent visuals and an impressive cast supplying decent performances. However, the labored, over-schematic script and strictly rulebook characterization mean that little suspense is generated. The surfeit of Civil War material out there signals merely okay B.O. at home, but Spanish territories could respond well and there's an outside chance of other pickups as well.

Given the richness and depth of the novel on which it is based, “The Carpenter’s Pencil” is strangely monotonous emotionally. Merely efficient pic has all the ingredients of the sumptuous Spanish Civil War drama it aspires to be: A storyline packed with incident, excellent visuals and an impressive cast supplying decent performances. However, the labored, over-schematic script and strictly rulebook characterization mean that little suspense is generated. The surfeit of Civil War material out there signals merely okay B.O. at home, but Spanish territories could respond well and there’s an outside chance of other pickups as well.

In Galicia, northern Spain, just before the outbreak of the Civil War in 1936, young Republican doctor Daniel Da Barca (Tristan Ulloa) is engaged to be married to Marisa Mallo (Maria Adanez). When he’s arrested for his left-wing beliefs by nervy nationalist Herbal (Luis Tosar), who becomes Daniel’s guard in prison, Marisa’s father, Benito (Manuel Manquina), tries to get her to marry a young nationalist soldier.

However, Marisa swears to be faithful to Daniel and manages to smuggle a gun into prison, right under the nose of Herbal. In fact, Herbal knows what’s going on, and this turns out to be the first of several lucky escapes for Daniel set up by Herbal – for plausible reasons only revealed toward the end.

The diffuse, unfocused script struggles to get across all the dramatic info that its rangy plot demands, generating plenty of over-literal, explanatory dialogue. Jerky structure means that pic is more memorable for its setpieces — as when a painter tells a parable about two sisters, Life and Death — although one sequence in which some prisoners burst into impromptu song is risible.

Given the motives for his unease about doing away with Daniel, Herbal is easily the most interesting figure, and a better script could have made him, as in the novel, profoundly moving. As Daniel, Ulloa lacks the presence to create a central figure the viewer can care about.

Other characters fall too neatly into Republican good, Nationalist bad stereotypes, with Nancho Novo doing a spectacularly nasty turn as a soldier, Zolo, who’s Herbal’s brother-in-law.

The Carpenter's Pencil

Spain

Production

A Warner Sogefilms release of a Morena Films, Portozas Vision, Sogecine production, in association with TeleMadrid, TVG, D&D Audiovisuals/Fish People, Caixanova, CTV. (International sales: Sogepaq, Madrid.) Produced by Juan Gordon, Anton Reixa. Directed by Anton Reixa

Crew

Screenplay, Reixa, Xose Morais, based on the novel by Manuel Rivas. Camera (color), Andreu Rebes; editor, Guillermo Represa; music, Lucio Godoy; art director, Juan Pedro de Gaspar; sound (Dolby Digital), Jose Antonio Rodriguez "Marmol." Reviewed at Warner screening rooms, Madrid, March 26, 2003. Running time: 106 min.

With

Tristan Ulloa, Luis Tosar, Maria Adanez, Manuel Manquina, Nancho Novo.
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading