Rick

A noxious little tale of Wall Street types whose amorality knows no limit, "Rick" takes smarmy knowingness to ludicrous extremes. Trying so hard to be hip that it's not, pic will land at most on the outer fringes of theatrical and cable markets.

With:
With: Bill Pullman, Aaron Stanford, Agnes Bruckner, Sandra Oh, Dylan Baker, Paz de la Huerta, Marianne Hagen, Emmanuelle Chriqui.

A noxious little tale of Wall Street types whose amorality knows no limit, “Rick” takes smarmy knowingness to ludicrous extremes. First directorial outing for longtime Gus Van Sant editor Curtiss Clayton buys into scripter Daniel Handler’s attempt to find an outrageous new angle from which to attack filthy creepy capitalists, resulting in a shrill, one-note caricature that only provides a hollow echo of the explicitly referenced “American Psycho.” Trying so hard to be hip that it’s not, pic will land at most on the outer fringes of theatrical and cable markets.

Title character (a game Bill Pullman) is a total suck-up to his crass young boss, Duke (Aaron Stanford), a lout carrying on via an Internet sex line with Rick’s teenage daughter, Eve (Agnes Bruckner). Crude early dialogue tries to outdo Mamet in its elaboration of men-among-men talk, while plot moves in a surreal direction with the entrance of a smooth-talking hit man (Dylan Baker) who specializes in bumping off corporate big shots. It all ends very badly, making for one of those films that makes one want to take a long shower afterward.

Rick

Production: A Content Films presentation in association with the 7th Floor of a Content Films/Ruth Charny production. (International sales: Cinetic Media, New York.) Produced by Charny, Jim Czarnecki, Sofia Sondervan. Executive producers, Edward R. Pressman, John Schmidt. Directed, edited by Curtiss Clayton. Screenplay, Daniel Handler.

Crew: Camera (color, digital), Lisa Rinzler; music, Ted Reichman; set decorator, Heidi Loeffler; costume designer, Alysia Raycraft; sound (Dolby Digital), Theresa K.K. Radka; supervising sound editor, Robert C. Jackson; line producer, Allen Bain; assistant director, Roger M. Bobb; casting, Amanda Mackey. Reviewed at Toronto Film Festival (Discovery), Sept. 7, 2003. Running time: 92 MIN.

With: With: Bill Pullman, Aaron Stanford, Agnes Bruckner, Sandra Oh, Dylan Baker, Paz de la Huerta, Marianne Hagen, Emmanuelle Chriqui.

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