As a fifth grader, John Cadigan was the most popular, athletic and artistic student in class. By his senior year in college, he had suffered a complete mental breakdown and nearly committed for life to a mental institution. Cadigan directed with assistance from his sister Katie. Fascinating and frustrating in nearly equal measure, pic preems on HBO/Cinemax in 2004.

As a fifth grader, John Cadigan was the most popular, athletic and artistic student in class. By his senior year in college, he had suffered a complete mental breakdown, was diagnosed as a schizophrenic and nearly committed for life to a mental institution. How Cadigan managed to escape that fate is the subject of the self-portrait “People Say I’m Crazy,” which Cadigan directed with assistance from his sister Katie. Fascinating and frustrating in nearly equal measure, pic, co-produced by Oscar winner Ira Wohl (“Best Boy”), is scheduled to premiere on HBO/Cinemax in 2004.

Echoing the final act of “A Beautiful Mind,” pic focuses almost exclusively on the rehabilitation process that has permitted the now 33-year-old Cadigan to re-enter society and enjoy a successful career as a woodcut artist. At nearly every turn, however, aud is left wanting to know more about the dark days of Cadigan’s past and how he descended into them. Minus that discussion, pic fails to grip the viewer emotionally in the way of the not-dissimilar recent docu “A Fine State This Is,” about an artist struggling with multiple personality disorder.

People Say I'm Crazy

Production

Produced by Katie Cadigan, Ira Wohl. Directed by John and Katie Cadigan.

Crew

Camera (color, DV), John Cadigan, Laura C. Murray, Katie Cadigan; editor, Murray; music, Evelyn Glennie. Reviewed on videocassette at Vancouver Film Festival (Nonfiction Features), Sept. 28, 2003. Running time: 83 MIN.
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