Review: ‘Hey, You Slovaks’

Slovakia's slow but steady path to democracy and economic independence is explored with candor and compassion in "Hey, You Slovaks." Illuminating item is suitable primarily for broadcast, human rights-oriented fest berths and public interest groups.

Slovakia’s slow but steady path to democracy and economic independence is explored with candor and compassion in “Hey, You Slovaks.” Illuminating item is suitable primarily for broadcast, human rights-oriented fest berths and public interest groups.

Pic opens with archival montage illustrating the past 70 years of Slovak history, as workers in 1932 declare, with irony typical to the region, “No work. No money. No bread. Good old times.” Rural voters argue the relative merits of political candidates during a 2001 May Day get-together, while Americans of Slovak heritage explore a village museum and speak of their ancestors’ lives in the mines and steel factories of Pennsylvania. Elderly workers at a now-deserted glassworks recount with touching resignation the reasons for the plant’s closing, affirming “Slovaks can bear a lot; they just get their backs ready.” Helmer Robert Kirchhoff has made pics on voting and Roma issues for the Bratislava-based Institute for Public Affairs, bringing to “Hey, You Slovaks” the same measured tone of dignity shot through with sadness and pride. Tech credits are skillful. Title comes from line in a folk song sung by a visiting American over the closing credits.

Hey, You Slovaks

Slovakia

Production

A 3S Studio production, in co-production with the Institute for Public Affairs. Directed, written by Robert Kirchhoff.

Crew

Camera (color), Martin Kollar, Norbert Hudec; editor, Roman Varga; music, Marta Hejtmankova, Robert Puskar. Reviewed at Karlovy Vary Film Festival (Special Video Screenings), July 4, 2003. Running time: 48 MIN.
Want to read more articles like this one? SUBSCRIBE TO VARIETY TODAY.
Post A Comment 0

Leave a Reply

No Comments

Comments are moderated. They may be edited for clarity and reprinting in whole or in part in Variety publications.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

More Film News from Variety

Loading