Awards gala set for Dec. 12 at DGA Theater

“Balseros” and “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” are sharing top honors in the Intl. Documentary Assn.’s 2003 feature competition.

Award presentations will be made Dec. 12 at the org’s awards gala at the Directors Guild of America Theater in Hollywood.

“Balseros” follows seven Cuban castaways over seven years in the United States. It was directed by Carlos Bosch and Josep M. Domenech, produced by Tom Roca and Loris Omedes, presented by HBO/Cinemax Documentary Films and distributed by Seventh Art Releasing.

“The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” tracks the 2002 takeover of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez’s palace and his return to power two days later. It was directed by Kim Bartley and Donnacha O’Briain, produced by David Power and Rod Stoneman, presented by HBO/Cinemax Documentary Films and distributed by Vitagraph Films.

‘Crow’ crowned

“The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow” won the limited-series competition for segments of a series with a specific continuing theme or subject. It was directed by Bill Jersey and Richard Wormser; produced by Jersey, Wormser and Sam Pollard; presented by Thirteen/WNET; and distributed by California Newsreel.

“American Experience: The Murder of Emmett Till” won the continuing-series competition for docs that are part of an ongoing series. It was directed by Stanley Nelson, exec produced by Margaret Drain and presented by American Experience/WGBH Boston.

Short honoree

“Chavez Ravine: A Los Angeles Story” won the short category for films under 40 minutes. Film was directed by Jordan Mechner and produced by Don Normark, Andy Andersen and Mark Moran.

“Bus 174″ won the IDA/ABC News VideoSource competition, recognizing historic news footage used to tell a nonfiction story. The doc was directed by Jose Padilha, produced by Marcos Prado, presented by HBO/Cinemax Documentary Films and distributed by ThinkFilm. “Bus 174″ grossed $127,683 in limited domestic release this fall.

“Berga: Soldiers of Another War” won the Pare Lorentz Award, presented by the Pare Lorentz Foundation. It was directed by the late Charles Guggenheim; produced by his daughter, Grace Guggenheim, Guggenheim Prods. and Thirteen/WNET New York; and distributed by PBS Home Video and CS Associates.

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