Review: ‘Marriage Is A Crazy Thing’

A well-written relationships movie, in which a pair of occasional lovers traverse the geography of a marriage without actually tying the knot, "Marriage Is a Crazy Thing" manages to make potentially over-smart material into quietly sophisticated entertainment. Film did very decent local biz this spring, though beyond Far East markets its audience lies in Asia-friendly events rather than more general arenas.

A well-written relationships movie, in which a pair of occasional lovers traverse the geography of a marriage without actually tying the knot, “Marriage Is a Crazy Thing” manages to make potentially over-smart material into quietly sophisticated entertainment. Film did very decent local biz this spring, though beyond Far East markets its audience lies in Asia-friendly events rather than more general arenas.

English Lit. lecturer Jun-yeong (Kam Woo-seong) and designer Yeon-heui (Eom Jeong-hwa), both in their early 30s, meet on a blind date and immediately progress beyond polite niceties to a sexual relationship that’s frank in its avoidance of marriage. He affects a lack of interest in settling down; she claims she early gave up trying to hook him. But both clearly harbor deeper feelings — and a need — for each other, as their on-off friendship continues into her marriage to another guy. Played in a knowing but not annoying way by the two leads (both mainly from TV), pic sports dialogue by sophomore director Yu Ha (adapting a 2000 novel) that doesn’t plumb great truths about male-female relationships but develops a charm of its own. Tech credits are sexy.

Marriage Is A Crazy Thing

South Korea

Production

A Big Blue Film release of an iPictures and Muhan Investment presentation, in association with Sidus, MVP Capital and Cinema Service, of a Sidus Entertainment Group production. (International sales: Cinema Service, Seoul.) Produced by Cha Seung-jae. Directed, written by Yu Ha, from the novel by Lee Man-gyo.

Crew

Camera (color), Kim Yeong-ho; editor, Park Gok-ji; music, Kim Jun-seok; art director, Park Il-hyeon. Reviewed at Pusan Film Festival (industry screenings), Nov. 19, 2002. Original title: Gyeolhoneun, michin jisida. (Also in Tokyo Film Festival, Winds of Asia.) Running time: 106 min.

With

With: Kam Woo-seong, Eom Jeong-hwa.
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