Let’s Not Cry!

A penniless musician returns to his native village in Central Asia and is gradually unmasked as a flaneur in "Let's Not Cry!", a well observed, cleanly shot black comedy that unfortunately doesn't have a second or third act.

With:
With: Muhammad Rahimo, Diaz Rakhmanitov, Dilvar Ekramova, Erkin Kamilrov, Muhsin Juranov. (Uzbek & Russian dialogue.)

A penniless musician returns to his native village in Central Asia and is gradually unmasked as a flaneur in “Let’s Not Cry!”, a well observed, cleanly shot black comedy that unfortunately doesn’t have a second or third act. First solo outing by South Korean director Min Boung-hun, who previously lensed and co-directed the Tajikistan-set “Flight of the Bee” with local helmer Jamshed Usmonov, is likely to have a small career on the fest circuit and some highly specialized TV sales on the strength of its exotic locations.

Pic has much of the same fable-like feel, rooted in the realities of contempo life in an ex-Soviet republic, as “Bee.” However, Min’s color lensing of the quietly spectacular landscape, bordered by snow-capped mountains, gives the movie a lyrical quality that his B&W photography in “Bee” could not approach. Pic is also, thankfully, free of the nods to Satyajit Ray that ran through the first film.

More interestingly, both Min and Usmonov have opted for similar tales in their solo, sophomore features. In “Cry!” a young gambler returns from Moscow to Uzbekistan to live in his aged mother’s home and finds himself barracked by locals to whom he owes money. In Usmonov’s “Angel on the Right” (which played in this year’s Cannes Un Certain Regard), a smalltime thug returns from Moscow to Tajikistan to see his dying mother, only to find he’s been lured into a trap by locals to whom he owes money.

Min’s basic idea is a clever, if hardly original, one and offers plenty of opportunities for a gentle comedy of manners as Muhammad (Muhammad Rahimo), clutching his precious violin case, arrives by local bus and truck in the small, remote village where he grew up in. He’s reputed to be a violin virtuoso with a glittering career in the Moscow Philharmonic, but when his mother suggests he help teach village children during his stopover he seems reluctant to take the instrument out of its case.

As the film settles into the laid-back rhythms of village life, Muhammad reacquaints himself but generally finds a hostile or suspicious reception. In a neatly played roadside conversation, a local businessman who’s building a vodka factory quickly exposes Muhammad as a flaneur, and the latter ends up cadging more favors as his lack of success becomes clear.

Min decorates this basic story with a touching subplot of a shy girl who takes a fancy to Mohammad (leaving a fresh egg by his bedroom window each morning), plus a more fanciful side story about Muhammad’s grandfather, who lives alone in the hills obsessively quarrying for gold in the rugged landscape. But like the main thread, neither of these is ever properly developed beyond their exposition: The whole picture ends up feeling like a pencil sketch with the colors waiting to be filled in.

Performances, however, are excellent across the board, with Rahimo underplaying his shyster role, and the rest of the cast showing a nice feel for oblique Asian conversations in which the subject at hand is never directly broached. It’s curious that, though as a dialogue writer Min shows a sure and sensitive hand, as a script writer he seems uninterested in architecture or development.

All credits on print caught were in Uzbek script and the original title given above is the Uzbek one. For the record, pic’s Korean title is “Gwaenchanha, uljima.”

Let's Not Cry!

South Korea-Uzbekistan

Production: A Seoul Entertainment, Media Mix Entertainment (South Korea)/Marmor Studio (Uzbekistan) production. (International sales: SEI, Seoul.) Produced by Jo Jae-hyung. Executive producers, Jeong Nam-hun, Kim Yong-taek. Directed, written by Min Boung-hun.

Crew: Camera (color), Min; editor, Park Gok-ji; music, Woo Jong-min; art director, Kim Yun-seob; costume designer, Rue bo-bi Blasofa ; sound (Dolby Digital), Lee Seung-chun, Sayora Hudoi Verdiva; assistant director, Lee Shi-ho; casting, Asyot Evijanov. Reviewed at Karlovy Vary Film Festival (competing), June 8, 2002. Running time: 106 MIN.

With: With: Muhammad Rahimo, Diaz Rakhmanitov, Dilvar Ekramova, Erkin Kamilrov, Muhsin Juranov. (Uzbek & Russian dialogue.)

More Film

  • INCAA To Award $2.6m Annually to

    INCAA Commits $2.6m Annually to International TV and Digital Platform Co-Production

    A penniless musician returns to his native village in Central Asia and is gradually unmasked as a flaneur in “Let’s Not Cry!”, a well observed, cleanly shot black comedy that unfortunately doesn’t have a second or third act. First solo outing by South Korean director Min Boung-hun, who previously lensed and co-directed the Tajikistan-set “Flight […]

  • Paramount Pictures Commits to ‘Re Loca’

    Paramount Pictures Commits to First Local Movie in Argentina: ‘Re Loca’ (EXCLUSIVE)

    A penniless musician returns to his native village in Central Asia and is gradually unmasked as a flaneur in “Let’s Not Cry!”, a well observed, cleanly shot black comedy that unfortunately doesn’t have a second or third act. First solo outing by South Korean director Min Boung-hun, who previously lensed and co-directed the Tajikistan-set “Flight […]

  • Lucian Pintilie Inspired Romanian New Wave,

    Lucian Pintilie Inspired Romanian New Wave, Local Filmmakers Say

    A penniless musician returns to his native village in Central Asia and is gradually unmasked as a flaneur in “Let’s Not Cry!”, a well observed, cleanly shot black comedy that unfortunately doesn’t have a second or third act. First solo outing by South Korean director Min Boung-hun, who previously lensed and co-directed the Tajikistan-set “Flight […]

  • PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT – In the

    Anna Paquin's ‘The Parting Glass,’ ‘Incredibles 2’ Make Edinburgh Fest Lineup

    A penniless musician returns to his native village in Central Asia and is gradually unmasked as a flaneur in “Let’s Not Cry!”, a well observed, cleanly shot black comedy that unfortunately doesn’t have a second or third act. First solo outing by South Korean director Min Boung-hun, who previously lensed and co-directed the Tajikistan-set “Flight […]

  • Barry Levinson to Be Feted at

    Barry Levinson to Be Feted at Karlovy Vary Film Festival

    A penniless musician returns to his native village in Central Asia and is gradually unmasked as a flaneur in “Let’s Not Cry!”, a well observed, cleanly shot black comedy that unfortunately doesn’t have a second or third act. First solo outing by South Korean director Min Boung-hun, who previously lensed and co-directed the Tajikistan-set “Flight […]

  • Spanish Film Director Alejandro Amenabar Poses

    Movistar + Moves Into Original Film With Alejandro Amenábar's Next Project (EXCLUSIVE)

    A penniless musician returns to his native village in Central Asia and is gradually unmasked as a flaneur in “Let’s Not Cry!”, a well observed, cleanly shot black comedy that unfortunately doesn’t have a second or third act. First solo outing by South Korean director Min Boung-hun, who previously lensed and co-directed the Tajikistan-set “Flight […]

  • 'The Pluto Moment' Review

    Cannes Film Review: 'The Pluto Moment'

    A penniless musician returns to his native village in Central Asia and is gradually unmasked as a flaneur in “Let’s Not Cry!”, a well observed, cleanly shot black comedy that unfortunately doesn’t have a second or third act. First solo outing by South Korean director Min Boung-hun, who previously lensed and co-directed the Tajikistan-set “Flight […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content