You will be redirected back to your article in seconds

Strike Up the Band

It's hard to believe that "Strike Up the Band," the musical satire by George S. Kaufman, with songs by George and Ira Gershwin, was considered so scathingly harsh and grim in 1927 that audiences rejected it. Today, in a well-mounted revival at the Freud Playhouse, the political content seems dated and quaint, a slim pretext on which to hang some of Broadway's greatest songs.

With:
Horace J. Fletcher - Charles Nelson Reilly Joan Fletcher - Melissa Dye Jim Townsend - Michael Maguire Mrs. Draper - Ruth Williamson Anne Draper - Hope Levy Timothy Harper - Troy Britton Johnson Colonel Holmes - Steve Vinovich C. Edgar Sloane - Stuart Pankin George Stelvin - Joe Joyce

It’s hard to believe that “Strike Up the Band,” the musical satire by George S. Kaufman, with songs by George and Ira Gershwin, was considered so scathingly harsh and grim in 1927 that audiences rejected it. Today, in a well-mounted revival at the Freud Playhouse, the political content seems dated and quaint, a slim pretext on which to hang some of Broadway’s greatest songs.

To most audiences, the showcasing of these songs will be enough. As directed by Don Amendolia, “Strike Up the Band” sings and dances away any objections we might have to inane dialogue or plot contrivances.

It opens with a clever establishing number, “The Horace J. Fletcher American Cheese Company,” which introduces us to the characters and sets the plot in motion.

The zany premise centers on an American tariff against Swiss cheese that elicits such an angry response from Switzerland that Horace J. Fletcher (Charles Nelson Reilly), owner of the American Cheese Co., pushes the U.S. to declare war.

A young pacifist, Jim Townsend (Michael Maguire), learns that Fletcher has been using Grade B milk for his cheese, incurring the enmity of war zealots who side with Fletcher and brand Townsend a traitor for owning a Swiss watch.

In the midst of this goofy political chicanery, Townsend falls in love with Fletcher’s daughter Joan (Melissa Dye). There’s an amusing subplot involving Fletcher with a man-hungry woman, Mrs. Draper (Ruth Williamson). Another young couple round out the array of romantic conflicts: Mrs. Draper’s daughter Anne (Hope Levy), who loves Fletcher employee Timothy (Troy Britton Johnson), but is forbidden by her mother to marry him until the mother finds a husband.

It’s a lot to keep up with, and would hardly be worth the effort if the dazzling numbers didn’t come barreling down in quick succession. The entire cast is multi-talented. Maguire and Dye are delightful pairing on “The Man I Love” and equally effective doing the “Soon” duet. Other standouts include the sensational ensemble socking across “Oh, This Is Such a Lovely War” and “Strike Up the Band.”

Williamson is a confident and arresting comedienne. Roles that feature predatory, middle-age man chasers are invariably overdone and embarrassing, but Williamson finds the humanity beneath her farcical surface.

Her lyric phrasing on “I’ve Got a Crush on You” is as much a tribute to her acting as her singing. Charles Nelson Reilly starts out tentatively and takes a while to find his footing, but he makes the greedy cheese magnate engaging and even touching.

Musical directors Peter Matz and Gerald Sternbach preserve the magic of Gershwin’s tunes, and Gene Castle rates a big hand for his inventive choreography. By dressing up this old-fashioned trifle, costume designer Scott A. Lane, lighting designer Tom Ruzika and sound designer Philip G. Allen also contribute strongly toward turning “Strike Up the Band” into lively entertainment.

Strike Up the Band

UCLA Freud Playhouse; 583 seats; $55 top

Production: A Reprise! Broadway's Best presentation of a musical in two acts with book by George S. Kaufman, music by George Gershwin, lyrics by Ira Gershwin. Producer, Marcia Seligson; music director, Peter Matz.

Creative: Choreography, Gene Castle; scenic design, Robert L. Smith; lighting, Tom Ruzika; sound, Philip G. Allen; costumes, Scott A. Lane. Opened and reviewed Feb. 21, 2001; closes March 4. Running time: 2 HOURS 30 MIN.

Cast: Horace J. Fletcher - Charles Nelson Reilly Joan Fletcher - Melissa Dye Jim Townsend - Michael Maguire Mrs. Draper - Ruth Williamson Anne Draper - Hope Levy Timothy Harper - Troy Britton Johnson Colonel Holmes - Steve Vinovich C. Edgar Sloane - Stuart Pankin George Stelvin - Joe JoyceEnsemble: Shari Berkowitz, Paul Del Vecchio, Alison Ewing, Susannah Hall, Chris Warren Murry, Natalie Nucci, Nancy O'Meara, Lauren Persico, Jim Raposa, Stephen Simon, Bill Szobody.

More Legit

  • J.K. Rowling on the Future of

    J.K. Rowling on the Future of Harry Potter Stories on Stage

    It’s hard to believe that “Strike Up the Band,” the musical satire by George S. Kaufman, with songs by George and Ira Gershwin, was considered so scathingly harsh and grim in 1927 that audiences rejected it. Today, in a well-mounted revival at the Freud Playhouse, the political content seems dated and quaint, a slim pretext […]

  • Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

    Broadway Review: 'Harry Potter and the Cursed Child'

    It’s hard to believe that “Strike Up the Band,” the musical satire by George S. Kaufman, with songs by George and Ira Gershwin, was considered so scathingly harsh and grim in 1927 that audiences rejected it. Today, in a well-mounted revival at the Freud Playhouse, the political content seems dated and quaint, a slim pretext […]

  • Hello, Dolly! Bette Midler

    Bette Midler to Return to Broadway's 'Hello, Dolly!'

    It’s hard to believe that “Strike Up the Band,” the musical satire by George S. Kaufman, with songs by George and Ira Gershwin, was considered so scathingly harsh and grim in 1927 that audiences rejected it. Today, in a well-mounted revival at the Freud Playhouse, the political content seems dated and quaint, a slim pretext […]

  • My Fair Lady review

    Broadway Review: 'My Fair Lady'

    It’s hard to believe that “Strike Up the Band,” the musical satire by George S. Kaufman, with songs by George and Ira Gershwin, was considered so scathingly harsh and grim in 1927 that audiences rejected it. Today, in a well-mounted revival at the Freud Playhouse, the political content seems dated and quaint, a slim pretext […]

  • Tony Awards: Sara Bareilles, Josh Groban

    Sara Bareilles, Josh Groban to Host 2018 Tony Awards

    It’s hard to believe that “Strike Up the Band,” the musical satire by George S. Kaufman, with songs by George and Ira Gershwin, was considered so scathingly harsh and grim in 1927 that audiences rejected it. Today, in a well-mounted revival at the Freud Playhouse, the political content seems dated and quaint, a slim pretext […]

  • New York Mayor's Office women

    New York Mayor's Office Details New $5 Million Women's Fund for Film, Theater

    It’s hard to believe that “Strike Up the Band,” the musical satire by George S. Kaufman, with songs by George and Ira Gershwin, was considered so scathingly harsh and grim in 1927 that audiences rejected it. Today, in a well-mounted revival at the Freud Playhouse, the political content seems dated and quaint, a slim pretext […]

  • Tina review

    West End Review: Tina Turner Musical 'Tina'

    It’s hard to believe that “Strike Up the Band,” the musical satire by George S. Kaufman, with songs by George and Ira Gershwin, was considered so scathingly harsh and grim in 1927 that audiences rejected it. Today, in a well-mounted revival at the Freud Playhouse, the political content seems dated and quaint, a slim pretext […]

More From Our Brands

Access exclusive content