Yes, Dear

Nothing says comedy like breast-feeding ... at least to the people behind CBS' "Yes, Dear." New sitcom taps into the nouveau baby boom and, at least in the second episode (pilot was not reviewed), offers up a dated collection of boob jokes. With NBC's "Daddio" hogging all the mild laughs about child rearing, it's up to this predictable project to be edgier and more risque. Instead, it comes off as merely stale and immature.

With:
Greg Warner - Anthony Clark Kim Warner - Jean Louisa Kelly Christine Hughes - Liza Snyder Jimmy Hughes - Mike O'Malley

Nothing says comedy like breast-feeding … at least to the people behind CBS’ “Yes, Dear.” New sitcom taps into the nouveau baby boom and, at least in the second episode (pilot was not reviewed), offers up a dated collection of boob jokes. With NBC’s “Daddio” hogging all the mild laughs about child rearing, it’s up to this predictable project to be edgier and more risque. Instead, it comes off as merely stale and immature. Still, it occupies an enviable slot in the Eye web’s lineup, sandwiched on Monday nights between “King of Queens” and “Everybody Loves Raymond.” It doesn’t deserve such a comfy home.

Despite a fine try by star Anthony Clark, who has a knack for being very funny in not-so-funny shows (“Boston Common”) “Dear’s” cast is its weakest element. The other three players are charmless, reciting every line with as little spontaneity as possible. What’s more, they all have a hard time playing off the goofy charisma Clark brings to each rigid scene. Get this guy a good project already!

The concept is hardly original: Two unlike sisters and their husbands live together. But bring offspring into the mix, and — voila! — that’s where the zaniness is supposed to come in.

Kim (Jean Louisa Kelly) and Greg (Clark) are new parents, battling latenight feedings and diaper bag fiascoes. Her sassy sib Christine (Liza Snyder) is a veteran mommy, raising two kids with the help of unemployed, couch-potato hubby Jimmy (Mike O’Malley).

In seg two, Kim returns to nursing her 1-year-old son after her inability to bond via bottle. So when it’s up to Greg to come to the rescue at feeding time, he discovers the only way to get the lad to stop crying is to dress up like Kim.Yikes!

Execs want so much to be family friendly, but they’re desperately running out of plotlines. How many laughs can suits milk out of youngsters and the adults who are supposed to lead them?

There are some chuckles that bubble up in “Yes, Dear,” but they are all from Clark, who approaches his role as a nerd who isn’t afraid to screw things up. It’s much appreciated in this otherwise dry effort with a conventional script from Bobby Bowman and Douglas Lieblein.

The choice timeslot is also wasted. While “Queens” and “Raymond” are broad laffers, their styles are completely different than this new entry. “Yes, Dear” doesn’t have any hilarious senior citizens (read: Peter Boyle, Jerry Stiller) to save the day, and the gags are everything auds have heard before.

Tech credits are adequate enough, though director Andrew Weyman’s bland execution could have used a tune-up.

Yes, Dear

CBS, Mon. Oct. 3; 8:30 p.m.

Production: Filmed in Los Angeles by Twentieth Century Fox Television. Executive producers, Alan Kirschenbaum, Greg Garcia; co-executive producers, Dianne Burroughs, Joey Gutierrez; producer, Jay Kleckner; director, Andrew D. Weyman; writers, Bobby Bowman, Douglas Lieblein; camera, Tony Yarlett; production designer, Lynn Griffin; editor, Gary Anderson; music, Rick Marotta; casting, Dava Waite. 30 MIN.

Cast: Greg Warner - Anthony Clark Kim Warner - Jean Louisa Kelly Christine Hughes - Liza Snyder Jimmy Hughes - Mike O'Malley

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