But Rosie tops Regis for yakker host kudos

NEW YORK — Who wants to be an Emmy winner?

ABC’s “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” took home its first Emmy award on Friday night at the 27th annual Daytime Emmy Awards, winning for best gameshow.

While “Millionaire” is largely credited with reviving the Alphabet web and boosting the fortunes of primetime television overall, it was shunted off to the Daytime Emmy awards when the primetime kudocast couldn’t find a category in which it could compete. While the decision initially perturbed Philbin, ABC and show producer Michael Davies, Davies made no mention of his grievances when accepting the nod.

“Regis Philbin, you are a god,” Davies said.

Maybe so, but Philbin was passed over in two categories. Regis lost a trophy for best gameshow host to veteran Bob Barker (“The Price Is Right”) and Tom Bergeron (“Hollywood Squares”), who tied in the category.

He also missed out on his last chance to win a best talkshow Emmy as Kathie Lee Gifford’s partner. Gifford will exit the ayem chatfest this summer; no replacement has been named. Philbin had been nominated seven previous times without a win.

Instead, Rosie O’Donnell won her fourth straight Daytime Emmy as best talkshow host. She has won the award every year she has been nominated. Longtime winner Oprah Winfrey no longer competes in the category.

“I sort of feel like the spoiled kid who gets this too many times,” said O’Donnell when she accepted the award.

Overall, CBS led the way with six winners on Friday, followed by ABC (five) and syndicated shows (four).

The evening was co-hosted by O’Donnell and Susan Lucci, who finally won best actress last year after 18 losses but wasn’t nominated this year.

Susan Flannery took best actress for her role in “The Bold and the Beautiful.” Anthony Geary of “General Hospital” won as best actor in a daytime drama for the second year in a row. It was his third win overall.

“General Hospital” also racked up nods for best supporting actress, best directing team and best drama — its seventh win in the category, the most of any show. The long-running soap beat out “The Young and the Restless,” which led the Daytime Emmy nom tally with a whopping 28.

The late Shari Lewis won the award for best performer in a children’s series. Her daughter accepted the award along with Lewis’ beloved puppet companion, Lamb Chop.

Shemar Moore, who won his first Emmy as best supporting actor on “The Young and the Restless,” brought a cell phone to the stage to call his mom. “Mom, I won this damn thing,” he said when she finally answered.

PBS’ “Sesame Street” shut out its competitors once again to win its sixth Emmy for best preschool series. Since the category was established, “Sesame Street” has been the only show to win.

The 27th annual Daytime Awards were presented by the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in association with the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Show was telecast live on ABC (except in the West) from a ceremony at Gotham’s Radio City Music Hall.

A complete list of Daytime Emmy winners follows:

DRAMA

“General Hospital” — Wendy Riche, executive producer; Julie Hanan Carruthers, senior supervising producer; Carol Scott, Lisa Levenson, producers; Marty Vagts, Shelley Curtis, consulting producers (ABC)

GAME/AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION SHOW

“Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” — Michael Davies, Paul Smith, executive producers; Vincent Rubino, producer; Ann Miller, supervising producer; Terrence McDonnell, senior producer; Nikki Webber, coordinating producer (ABC)

CHILDREN’S SERIES

“Disney Presents: Bill Nye the Science Guy” — James McKenna, Erren Gottlieb, Elizabeth Brock, executive producers; Jamie Hammond, coordinating producer; Bill Nye, science producer (syn)

CHILDREN’S SPECIAL

“Summer’s End” — Connie Tavel, Gina Matthews, executive producers; Frank Siracusa, Patrick Whitley, producers (Showtime)

CHILDREN’S ANIMATED PROGRAM

“Steven Spielberg’s Pinky, Elmira and the Brain” — Steven Spielberg, executive producer; Tom Ruegger, senior producer; Rusty Mills, supervising producer; John McCann, producer-writer; Charles M. Howell IV, producer; Tom Sheppard, Wendell Morris, Gordon Bressack, Earl Kress, writers; Andrea Romano, Rob Davies, Nelson Recinos, directors (WB)

SPECIAL CLASS – ANIMATED PROGRAM

William Joyce’s Rolie Polie Olie – William Joyce, Micheal Hirsch, Patrick Loubert, Clive A. Smith, Fabrice Giger, executive producers; Stephen Hodgins, supervising producer; Scott Dyer, Guillaume Hellouin, Pam Lehn, Corrine Kouper, Eric Flaherty, Christoohe Archimbault, producers; Mike Fallows, supervising director; Ron Pitts, director; Nadine Van Der Velde, Ben Joseph, Scott Kraft, Pete Sauder, Nicola Barton, writers.(Dis)

TALK SHOW

“The Rosie O’Donnell Show” — Rosie O’Donnell, Bernie Young, Roni Selig, executive producers; Laurie Rich, coordinating producer, Corin Nelson, David Perler, supervising producers; Rob Dauber, Deirdre Dod, Mimi Pizzi, John Redmann, Joy Trapani, senior producers; Janette Barber, Rita Barry, Lauren Berlly, Jeffry Culbreth, Deborah D’Amato, Christina Deyo, Sharon Kelly, Terence Noonan, Maria Notaras, Liza Persky, producers (syn)

LEAD ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES

Susan Flannery — “The Bold & the Beautiful” (CBS)

LEAD ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES

Anthony Geary — “General Hospital” (ABC)

SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES

Sarah Brown — “General Hospital” (ABC)

SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES

Shemar Moore — “The Young and the Restless” (CBS)

YOUNGER ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES

Camryn Grimes — “The Young and the Restless” (CBS)

YOUNGER ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES

David Tom — “The Young and the Restless” (CBS)

GAME SHOW HOST

Bob Barker — “The Price Is Right” (CBS)

Tom Bergeron — “Hollywood Squares” (syn)

TALK SHOW HOST

Rosie O’Donnell — “The Rosie O’Donnell Show” (syn)

DRAMA SERIES DIRECTING TEAM

“General Hospital” — Joseph Behar, Shelley Curtis, William Ludel, Scott McKinsey, Alan Pultz, directors; Christine R. Magarian, Ron Cates, Jeffery Rabin, associate directors; Craig McManus, Kathy Ladd and Susan Neigher, stage managers (ABC)

DRAMA SERIES WRITING TEAM

“The Young and the Restless” (CBS) — Kay Alden, head writer; William J. Bell, senior executive story consultant; Trent Jones, Jerry Birn, John F. Smith, Natalie Minardi, Jim Houghton, Eric Freiwald, Janice Ferri, Rex M. Best, Michael Minnis, Randy Holland, writers (CBS)

ART DIRECTION/SET DECORATION/SCENIC DESIGN

The Rosie O’Donnell Show – Katheleen Ankers, production designer; Diann Duthie, art director; Clay Brown, art director (syn)

TECHNICAL DIRECTION/ELECTRONIC CAMERA/VIDEO CONTROL FOR A DRAMA SERIES

All My Children – Boyd Dumrose, production designer; Eric Harriz, Joel Reynolds,Bryan Johnson, Peter Yesair, scenic designers. (ABC)

SINGLE CAMERA PHOTOGRAPHY

Roger Corman’s “The Phantom Eye” – Chris Manley, diretor of photography (AMC)

COSTUME DESIGN/STYLING

Noddy – Juul Haalmeyer, costume designer (PBS)

COSTUME DESIGN FOR A DRAMA SERIES

One Life to Live – Susan Gammie, Sally Lesser, David Brooks, costume designers (ABC)

DIRECTING IN A GAME/AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION SHOW

Who Wants to be a Millionaire – Mark Gentile, director (ABC)

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