Equal parts screwball comedy and neo-classic Greek tragedy, "Fallen Arches" is yet another riff on the mob. Helmer Ron Cosentino does a nice job balancing conflicting tones, but in a time of gangster-saturated entertainment, pic may not be edgy enough to find life beyond the festival circuit.

Equal parts screwball comedy and neo-classic Greek tragedy, “Fallen Arches” is yet another riff on the mob. Helmer Ron Cosentino does a nice job balancing conflicting tones, but in a time of gangster-saturated entertainment, pic may not be edgy enough to find life beyond the festival circuit.

Saddled with an alcoholic mother (Karen Black) and an irresponsible younger brother, Frankie (Justin Louis), streetwise Duke Romano (Carmine D. Giovinazzo) tries to protect his family. But he can’t prevent Frankie from making a colossally bad decision — robbing a truckload of designer shoes from hot-tempered local mob boss Nicky Kaplan (Richard Portnow). When Nicky unleashes his henchmen to find the shoe thief, Frankie desperately tries to save himself — but the cards have been dealt. With an emphasis on dark pool halls and airless hideouts, Alejandro Rivera’s stylish production design gives contempo L.A. a retro, noirish look, nicely echoed in Portnow’s characterization. The brothers’ close, doomed relationship is pic’s most poignant element, and perfs are solid all around.

Fallen Arches

Production

A Saraghina Film Co. presentation in association with Pemdola Prods. Produced by Libby Osborn, Ron Cosentino. Co-producer, Victor Cosentino. Directed, written, edited by Ron Cosentino. Camera (color), Darko Suvak; music, Rick Giovinazzo; production designer, Alejandro Rivera; costume designer, Aimee House. Reviewed at Palm Springs Film Festival, Jan. 15, 2000. Running time: 69 MIN.

With

With: Carmine D. Giovinazzo, Justin Louis, Karen Black, Peter Onorati, Richard Portnow.
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